Category Podcasts

Municipal problems in mediaeval Switzerland
Podcasts

Municipal problems in mediaeval Switzerland

Municipal problems in mediaeval SwitzerlandBy John Martin VincentJohn Hopkins University, 1905Introduction: By the end of the Middle Ages many European cities had become almost sovereign states. This was not their original condition but was the result of a process extending over long periods of time.

Read More

Podcasts

The Illnesses of King Richard and King Philippe on the Third Crusade

The Illnesses of King Richard and King Philippe on the Third Crusade: An Understanding of arnaldia and leonardie By Thomas Gregor WagnerCrusades, Vol.10 (2011)Introduction: The crusade of King Richard I of England and Philippe Augustus II of France was ill-fated. In 1191, after just a few days of intense fighting before the walls of Acre, both kings fell ill from an enigmatic illness known in Latin as arnaldia and in French as leonardie.
Read More
Podcasts

The ‘Viking Apocalypse’ of 22nd February 2014: An Analysis of the Jorvik Viking Centre’s Ragnarǫk and Its Media Reception

The ‘Viking Apocalypse’ of 22nd February 2014: An Analysis of the Jorvik Viking Centre’s Ragnarǫk and Its Media ReceptionBy Joseph S. HopkinsRMN Newsletter No. 8 (2014)Introduction: If one signed on to a social media site, checked a news website or, in some cases, even watched one’s local evening news during mid- to late February 2014, one may have encountered some surprising news: as predicted by “scholars” or “experts”, perhaps “according to Norse mythology” or even according to a mysterious “Viking calendar”, a “Viking apocalypse” was to occur on Saturday, 22nd February 2014.
Read More
Podcasts

Is there a Sixth Sense in the Lady and the Unicorn Tapestries?

Is there a Sixth Sense in the Lady and the Unicorn Tapestries?By Anne DavenportThe New Arcadia Review, Volume 4 (2011)Introduction: What did our medieval forebears (those strangers for whom we feel a mixture of hostility and regret) have to say about hosting the stranger? In medieval tapestries, the most visible stranger, often a mythical animal, may serve as a playful lure designed to initiate the viewer into the far greater strangeness of his own soul.
Read More
Podcasts

Arms and Armor: A Farewell to Persistant Myths and Misconceptions

Arms and Armor: A Farewell to Persistant Myths and MisconceptionsBy Dirk BreidingPerspectives on Medieval Art – Learning through Looking, edited by Ena Giurescu Heller and Patricia C. Pongracz (New York: Museum of Biblical Art, 2010)Introduction: Attempting to study the European Middle Ages without encountering the concepts and ideals of chivalry, in all their various forms and manifestations, would probably be an impossible undertaking.
Read More
Podcasts

Women, Heresy, and Crusade: Toward a Context for Jacques de Vitry’s Relationship to the Early Beguines

Women, Heresy, and Crusade: Toward a Context for Jacques de Vitry’s Relationship to the Early BeguinesBenjamin A. WrightA Mirror for Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Selected Proceedings of the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies (2012) Multidisciplinary Graduate Student ConferenceAbstractJacques de Vitry (1165/70–1240) has been a familiar name in histories of the Beguines, which were religious communities not living according to an established rule and not bound by traditional monastic vows.
Read More
Podcasts

Making Sacrifices: Beowulf and Film

Making Sacrifices: Beowulf and FilmNick Haydock (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez)The Year’s Work in Medievalism : Volume 27 (2012) AbstractMysteriously, even ostentatiously sublime, the opening of Beowulf has puzzled, enthused, and enervated generations of readers. The uncanny parallel it draws between the ship burial of a king and the miraculous survival of a cast away—a boy, set adrift alone on the sea, who washed ashore in Denmark, subsequently held all Scandinavia in awe and fathered the Shielding dynasty—inspires complex and conflicting sensations.
Read More
Podcasts

Asteriscos et obelos suis locis restitui – the revision of the Psalter during the Carolingian Renaissance

Asteriscos et obelos suis locis restitui – the revision of the Psalter during the Carolingian RenaissancePaper by Evina SteinovaGiven at the 2014 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds smarads The psalter was perhaps the most ubiquitous book in the early Middle Ages. It was used in the classroom to teach reading and writing, it was the basis of the daily office, and as such was present in every monastery and cathedral.
Read More
Podcasts

A Peripheral Matter?: Oceans in the East in Late-Medieval Thought, Report and Cartography

A Peripheral Matter?: Oceans in the East in Late-Medieval Thought, Report and CartographyMarianne O’DohertyPostcards from the Edge: European Peripheries in the Middle Ages, Proceedings of the Institute (Leeds) Postgraduate Symposium (2009)AbstractIt is something of a truism that the Ocean Sea mare oceanum in medieval texts and cartography) marked out a real and conceptual periphery for medieval Western Europeans.
Read More
Podcasts

Dreaming the Middle Ages: American Neomedievalism in A Knight’s Tale and Timeline

Dreaming the Middle Ages: American Neomedievalism in A Knight’s Tale and TimelineBy Zuleyha Cetiner-OktemInteractions, Vol. 18:1 (2009)Abstract: Ever since the Middle Ages officially ended, there has been a constant return to the medieval era throughout the ensuing centuries. These persistent returns, though similar in form, have shown a great diversity in essence; hence the emerging terms, medievalism, modern medievalism, postmodern medievalism, and so forth.
Read More
Podcasts

The Vikings: Myths and Misconceptions

The Vikings: Myths and MisconceptionsBy Brian McMahonViking Myths and Rituals on the Isle of Man, edited by Leszek Gardeła and Carolyne Larrington (University of Nottingham, 2014)Introduction: Never before has such terror appeared in Britain as we have now suffered from a pagan race… The heathens poured out the blood of saints around the altar, and trampled on the bodies of saints in the temple of God, like dung in the streets.
Read More
Podcasts

Restaurants, Inns and Taverns That Never Were: Some Reflections on Public Consumption in Medieval Cairo

Restaurants, Inns and Taverns That Never Were: Some Reflections on Public Consumption in Medieval CairoBy Paulina B. LewickaJournal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, Vol. 48, No. 1 (2005)Abstract: The article shows that, contrary to a commonly accepted assumption, no public consumption facilities such as restaurants, taverns or inns existed in medieval Cairo.
Read More
Podcasts

What Type of Warrior (or Assassin) Are You?

Become a PatronWe& 39;ve created a Patreon for Our Site as we want to transition to a more community-funded model.We aim to be the leading content provider about all things medieval. Our website, podcast and Youtube page offers news and resources about the Middle Ages. We hope that are our audience wants to support us so that we can further develop our podcast, hire more writers, build more content, and remove the advertising on our platforms.
Read More
Podcasts

Enemy and Ancestor: Viking Identities and Ethnic Boundaries in England and Normandy, c.950 – c.1015

Enemy and Ancestor: Viking Identities and Ethnic Boundaries in England and Normandy, c.950 – c.1015By Katherine Clare CrossPhD Dissertation, University College London, 2014Abstract: This thesis is a comparison of ethnicity in Viking Age England and Normandy. It focuses on the period c.950-c.1015, which begins several generations after the initial Scandinavian settlements in both regions.
Read More
Podcasts

What’s Happening in Medieval Archaeology this Summer

Here are some videos posted this summer about archaeological work currently taking place that involves medieval finds.Crossrail Archaeology: Behind the HoardingsThe construction of Crossrail through the heart of London is resulting in one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever undertaken in the UK.
Read More
Podcasts

The World in 1467: The Maps of Nicolaus Germanus

Back in the second century AD, the Roman geographer Claudius Ptolemy created his Cosmographia – the precursor of the modern atlas. His work gave a description of the world, along with maps of various lands. During the Middle Ages, knowledge of Ptolemy’s work survived in the Middle East and Byzantium, and around the beginning of the fifteenth-century it was rediscovered by Western Europe.
Read More
Podcasts

Real and imaginary journeys in the later Middle Ages

Real and imaginary journeys in the later Middle AgesJ.K. Hyde (University of Manchester)Bulletin of the John Rylands Library: Vol. 65:2 (1982)AbstractFor a proper understanding of the actions of men in the past it is necessary to have some idea of how they conceived the world and their place in it, yet for the medieval period there is a serious inbalance in the sources.
Read More