Category Podcasts

King Edmund Ironside
Podcasts

King Edmund Ironside

By Susan AbernethyIt was the early eleventh century and England was being overrun by Vikings. Parts of the country were in the hands of the Danes and they were trying to acquire more. King Aethelred, known as the “Unready”, was weak and ineffectual in fighting off the threat. His son Edmund had watched what was happening and when the time was right, he decided to take action.

Read More

Podcasts

More wine, meat and exotic birds: What Richard III’s bones reveal about what he ate

The remains of Richard III have given researchers the ability to learn a vast amount about the life of the medieval English monarch. The latest study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, has uncovered fascinating new details about what his diet was and where he lived.This research will also be presented in a documentary, Richard III: The New Evidence, that airs on British television’s Channel 4 on Sunday, August 17th.
Read More
Podcasts

Ecstatic Dance: Medieval Dansomania and the Love Parade in Berlin, 1996

Ecstatic Dance: Medieval Dansomania and the Love Parade in Berlin, 1996By Irina MetzlerManifold, Vol. 4, No. 1/2 (1997)Introduction: The focus of this article is on the medicalisation of dance, on how certain types of dance, depending on the social context, are seen by commentators as being akin to illness, rather than “legitimate” dance (such as e.
Read More
Podcasts

The Sisters of King Æthelstan

The Sisters of King ÆthelstanBy Susan AbernethyKing Edward the Elder, son and successor of Alfred the Great of England, had many children. There were three women in his life that may or may not have been his wives. With these women, he had five sons and eight or nine daughters. Before Edward died, he began a concerted effort to marry his daughters to leaders on the continent.
Read More
Podcasts

Rethinking Hardown Hill: Our Westernmost Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery?

Rethinking Hardown Hill: Our Westernmost Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery?The Antiquaries Journal: First View Article, July (2014)AbstractThis paper reassesses the early Anglo-Saxon assemblage from Hardown Hill, Dorset. Wingrave excavated the objects in 1916 but apart from his 1931 report, and Evison’s 1968 analysis, there has been little subsequent discussion.
Read More
Podcasts

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of Egypt

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of EgyptMary Helen GalluchNewberry Essays in Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Volume 8, Selected Proceedings of the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies 2014 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student ConferenceAbstractIn her book titled Écriture et réécriture hagiographiques, Monique Goullet asserts, “It seems to me that one of the most interesting phenomena in hagiographic discourse, for those who want to apprehend from it a double historical and literary dimension, resides in the usage of rewriting, which establishes a system of cross-references between the texts dedicated to one particular saint.
Read More
Podcasts

Cannibals and Crusaders

Cannibals and CrusadersBy Jay RubensteinFrench Historical Studies, Vol. 31 (2008)Introduction: The First Crusade began in 1096 with massacres of Jews along the Rhine, and its penultimate act in 1099 was the killing of nearly all of Jerusalem’s inhabitants — men, women, and children. The events sparked serious discussion among contemporary witnesses and continue to do so among scholars today.
Read More
Podcasts

The cultural identity of medieval Silesia: the case of art and architecture

The cultural identity of medieval Silesia: the case of art and architectureRomuald Kaczmarek (University of Wrocław)Cuius Regio? Ideological and Territorial Cohesion of the Historical Region of Silesia (c. 1000-2000) vol. 1.: The Long Formation of the Region Silesia (c. 1000–1526)AbstractThe cultural identity of architecture and visual arts of the Middle Ages in Silesia can be analyzed in the following frameworks: 1.
Read More
Podcasts

Famous Last Words from the Middle Ages

From the strange to the serene, here are some last words by kings, queens, saints, warriors and other people from the Middle Ages.“Shoot, you devil! Shoot, in the devil’s name! Shoot, or it will be worse for you!” ~ William II, King of England (d.1100) had gone hunting with Walter Tirel and was shouting at him to shoot at a deer.
Read More
Podcasts

Holy Islands and the Otherworld: Places Beyond Water

Holy Islands and the Otherworld: Places Beyond WaterBy Eldar HeideIsolated Islands in Medieval Nature, Culture and Mind, eds. Gerhard Jaritz and Torstein Jørgensen (Bergen: Central European University, 2011)Introduction: In this article I attempt to demonstrate that there is a connection between holy islands and notions of an Otherworld beyond water.
Read More
Podcasts

Seamus Heaney and Beowulf

Seamus Heaney and BeowulfBy M.J. ToswellCahier Calin. Makers of the Middle Ages. Essays in Honor of William Calin, edited by Richard Utz and Elizabeth Emery (Kalamazoo: Studies in Medievalism, 2011)Introduction: Anglo-Saxonists everywhere should celebrate, perhaps annually in a brief offering of gifts at a local temple, the remarkable fact that Seamus Heaney completed his commissioned translation of Beowulf and published it in 1999, creating the first breaking wave of what was already a gradual tidal swell of interest in the text.
Read More
Podcasts

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272Katherine HarveyNottingham Medieval Studies: 55 (2011), pp. 125-48AbstractIn August 1228, following the death of Stephen Langton, the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury assembled to elect his successor. Their choice was quickly made: within a month of Langton’s death Walter of Eynsham, a member of the cathedral chapter, was archbishop-elect of Canterbury.
Read More
Podcasts

Ten Things You May Not Have Noticed in the Bayeux Tapestry

The Bayeux Tapestry is one of the most interesting pieces of art from the Middle Ages. Created in the late 11th century to show the events of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, the tapestry has many well-known images. However, the designer of the Bayeux Tapestry also included little details that might be missed by the casual viewer.
Read More
Podcasts

What Kind of Ninja Would You Have Been?

The Ninja had many roles in their clans: some were unarmed experts, while others used a particular weapon. Still, others were Kunoichi–female ninja! Only one was the grandmaster! This test will reveal what role you might have fulfilled in an ancient clan!More Fun!What Type of Warrior (or Assassin) Are You?
Read More
Podcasts

Britain and the beginning of Scotland

Britain and the beginning of ScotlandLecture by Dauvit BrounGiven on December 5, 2013 at The British AcademyThe often-repeated account of Scotland’s beginnings in a ‘union of Picts and Scots under Cinaed (Kenneth) mac Ailpín’ has been numerously called into doubt over the years. In this lecture Professor Dauvit Broun explores recent rethinking on Scottish origins by discussing the role of Britain as an ‘idea’, connections with England, the emergence of Scotland as a country in the 13th century, and the beginnings of the Scottish kingdom itself.
Read More
Podcasts

Ten Medieval Warrior Women

While Joan of Arc is well-known as a woman who was involved in medieval warfare, there are many more examples of women who took up arms or commanded armies during the Middle Ages. Here is our list of ten medieval warrior women.1. Joan of ArcWhile her military career only lasted slightly longer than a year, Joan of Arc is one of the most well-known figures from the Middle Ages.
Read More
Podcasts

Gratian’s Dilemma: The Man, the Prostitute, the Maid and the Infidel

The Decretum Gratiani is the most important work written about Canon Law in the Middle Ages. Written in two versions by Gratian, a scholar and Bishop of Chiusi who died in 1144 or 1145, the Decretum was a widely influential work that examined the laws of the Catholic church.One of the most interesting sections in the Decretum is where Gratian offers 36 imaginary scenarios, and asks his readers various questions based on them.
Read More