Articles

Henry of Lancaster and Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines

Henry of Lancaster and Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines

Henry of Lancaster and Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines

Labarge, Margaret Wade

Florilegium, Volume 2 (1980)183-191

Abstract

Henry of Lancaster — contemporary, companion, and cousin of Edward III — was regarded as one of the outstanding figures of a reign which abounded in colourful chivalric personalities.’*’ Created earl of Derby in 1337, Henry succeeded to his father’s earldom of Lancaster in 1345. His work for King Edward as military leader, political adviser, and dip­lomat was so outstanding that the king in 1351 gave him the personal title of duke of Lancaster — the first time that a duke had been named outside the immediate royal family. In many way;: Henry appeared cut to Froissart’s favourite pattern, for he was universally admired as a noble and courteous knight, good-looking, fond of hunting and jousting, proud of his armour and skill in dancing. More surprisingly, even other French and Scottish chroniclers recognized this enemy’s abilities, praising him as one of the best warriors of his day, a man who was wise and brave, famous for largesse and honesty, generous in almsgiving and gifts to religious foundations.


Watch the video: Irish Potato Famine - Isle of Blight - Extra History - #1 (November 2021).