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Buchanan DD- 131 - History

Buchanan DD- 131 - History


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Buchanan

Born in Baltimore, Md., 17 September 1800, Franklin Buchanan entered the Navy as a Midshipman on board Java in 1815. He organized the Naval Academy and served as its first superintendent (1845-47). He commanded the sloop Germantown in the Mexican War; the steam sloop Susquehanna, flagship of Perry's Squadron, in the expedition to Japan in 1852; and in 1859, became Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard. In 1861 he joined Confederate forces at Richmond, Va., and for gallant and meritorious conduct he was promoted to Admiral, the ranking officer in the Confederate States Navy. He was twice wounded severely and was taken prisoner of war, 5 August 1864. Admiral Buchanan died at his home "The Rest" in Talbot County, Md., 11 May 1874.

1

(DD-131: dp. 1154; 1. 3.14'5"; b. 31'8"; dr. 9'; s. 35.4 k.
cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 13", 12 21" TT.; cl. Wickes)

The first Buchanan (DD-131) was launched 2 January 1919 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine; sponsored by Mrs. Charles P. Wetherbee; and commissioned 20 January 1919, Lieutenant H. H. J. Bensen in command.

Buchanan reported to Commander, Destroyer Force, at Guantanamo, Cuba, and was temporarily attached to Destroyer Squadron 2 until ordered to the Pacific Fleet in July 1919 for duty with Destroyer Flotilla 4. From 7 June 1922 until 10 April 1930 Buchanan was out of commission at San Diego. She then joined Destroyer Division 10, Destroyer Squadrons, Battle Force, and operated on the west coast in routine division, force, and fleet activities and problems. In the summer of 1934, after making a cruise to Alaska with ROTC units aboard, she was placed in reduced commission attached to Rotating Reserve Destroyer Squadron 20 at San Diego.

Again placed in full commission in December 1934, she resumed operations with Division 5, Destroyers, Battle Force. Buchanan was again out of commission at San Diego from 9 April 1937 until 30 September 1939. She was then refitted for action with Division 65, Destroyer Squadron 32, Atlantic Squadron, and from December 1939 until 22 February 1940 operated with the Neutrality Patrol and Antilles Detachment. She was then assigned to patrol In the Gulf of Mexico, operating out of Galveston, Tex., and later off Key West and around the Florida Straits. She arrived at Boston Navy Yard 2 September and then proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where on 9 September 1940 she was decommissioned and transferred in the destroyer-land bases exchange to the United Kingdom.

Commissioned in the Royal Navy on the day of transfer she was renamed HMS Campbeltown. Upon her arrival at Devonport, England, 29 September 1940,

168

Campbeltown was allocated to the 7th Escort Group, Liverpool, in the Western Approaches Command. In January 1941 she was provisionally allocated to the Royal Netherlands Navy, but reverted to the Royal Navy in September 1941. Between September 1941 and March 1942 she served with Atlantic convoys and was attacked on several occasions by enemy U-boats and aircraft, but escaped without damage. On 15 September 1941 she picked up the survivors of the Norwegian motor tanker Vinga, damaged by an enemy air attack.

Her end came as a fitting conclusion to her fine career, for she acted as blockship in the lock entrance at St. Nazaire during the raid of 28 March 1942. Early that morning she was driven straight at her objective under withering fire. Her commandos scrambled ashore and commenced their demolition work. After scuttling her, her crew escaped in motor boats. Eleven hours later, her five tons of delayed action high explosives blew up, inflicting heavy casualties among the German members of an inspection party who had gone on board and wrought great havoc in the port. Campbeltown's captain, Lieutenant Commander S. Beattie, R. N., who was taken prisoner of war, was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry.

II

(DD-484: dp. 1630; 1. 348'3"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5"; s. 37.4
k.; cpl. 276; a. 4 5", 5 21" TT.; cl. Gleaves)

The second Buchanan (DD-484) was launched 22 November 1941 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J.; sponsored by Miss Hildreth Meiere, greatgranddaughter of Admiral Buchanan; and commissioned 21 March 1942, Commander D. L. Roscoe, Jr., in command

Buchanan got underway for the Pacific 28 May 1942 She played an effective role in the landings at Guadalcanal and Tulagi (7-9 August) and on 9 August she was present during the Battle of Savo Island and rescued many survivors of Astoria (CA-44), Quincy (CA-39), Vincennes (CA-44), and HMAS Canberra, sunk during the battle. In September she escorted Wasp (CV-7) and other units to Noumea, New Caledonia. Shortly thereafter, as part of TF 64.2, Buchanan assisted in the occupation of Funafuti Island in the Ellice Islands.

On the night of 11-12 October, as a unit of TG 64.2, Buchanan took part in the Battle of Cape Esperance. On 12 November the destroyer was damaged during the initial stages of the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal when she was accidentally hit by U. S. naval gunfire. She suffered the loss of five of her crew and had to withdraw from the action. After undergoing repairs, she was assigned to convoy escort duty until February 1943.

After leave in Sydney, Australia, Buchanan joined the screen of TF 15. On 30 April 1943, while screening in convoy, the ship ran aground off the southern coast of Guadalcanal and, after jettisoning heavy gear and ammunition, she was eased off the reef by three tugs. She proceeded to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, for repairs. Repairs completed, she participated in the New Georgia Group operations (30 June- 13 July) and while under heavy attack she effectively bombarded the enemy shore batteries during the invasion of Rendova. She participated in the bombardment of Munda (12 July) and the Battle of Kolombangara (13 July). Buchanan was damaged when she collided with Woodworth (DD-460) during the latter engagement and retired to Noumea for repairs. During the ensuing months, Buchanan convoyed ships to Noumea, Espiritu Santo, and Guadalcanal. She participated in the Treasury-Bougainville operation (1-11 November), taking part in the Rabaul and Buka-Bonis strikes. Next, as a, unit of TF 38, she bombarded Shortland Island and Bougainville (8 and 13 January 1944). On 22 January, while going to the rescue of the torpedoed oiler Cache (AO-67), Buchanan hunted down and sank the Japanese submarine RO-37 in 11'47' S., 164'17' E.

During February the destroyer participated in various phases of the Bismarck Archipelago operation (15 February-1 March). She covered the Green Island landings and took an active part in the bombardment of Kavieng, Rabaul, and New Ireland before steaming to the United States to undergo a yard overhaul at Mare Island.

Upon completion of overhaul and refresher training Buchanan returned to the Pacific and served with the transport screen during the assault and capture of the southern Palaus (6 September-14 October 1944). She next participated in the strikes against Luzon between 14 and 16 December. On 18 December she was damaged by a typhoon in the Philippine Sea. Upon completion of repairs she engaged in attacks on Luzon, Formosa, and the China coast (6-16 January 1945) in support of the Luzon operation. During the remainder of World War II she participated in the Iwo Jima invasion (15 February-5 March) ; Okinawa operation and supporting 3d and 5th Fleet raids (16 March-30 June); as well as the 3d Fleet operations against Japan (10 July -15 August 1945).

On 29 August she entered Tokyo Bay escorting South Dakota (BB-57). On 1 September she carried Fleet Admirals Nimitz and Halsey from their respective flagships to Yokohama where they met with General MacArthur and then returned them to the fleet. The following day she carried General MacArthur to Missouri (BB63) where he accepted the Japanese surrender and then returned him to Yokohama. She remained on occupation duty in the Par Bast until 8 October and then departed for San Francisco where she arrived 20 October. Buohanan steamed to Charleston, S. C., for pre-inactivation overhaul and went out of commission in reserve there 21 May 1946.

Buchanan was recommissioned 11 December 1948 at Charleston and underwent shakedown and refresher training with a nucleus Turkish crew aboard. On 29 March 1949 she got underway for Goleuk, Turkey, where she was turned over to the Turkish Navy 28 April 1949.

Buchanan received the Presidential Unit Citation and 15 battle stars for her World War II service.


Buchanan DD- 131 - History

From: DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL FIGHTING SHIPS, Vol. I, p. 168.

Born in Baltimore, Md., 17 September 1800, Franklin Buchanan entered the Navy as a Midshipman on board Java in 1815. He organized the Naval Academy and served as its first superintendent (1845-47). He commanded the sloop Germantown in the Me xican War the steam sloop Susquehanna, flagship of Perry's Squadron in the expedition to Japan in 1852, and in 1859, became Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard. In 1861 he joined Confederate forces at Richmond, Va., and for gallant and meritori ous conduct he was promoted to Admiral, the ranking officer in the Confederate States Navy. He was twice wounded severely and was taken prisoner of war, 5 August 1864. Admiral Buchanan died at his home "The Rest" in Talbot County, Md., 11 May 1874.

(DD-131: dp. 1154 l. 314'5" b. 31'8" dr. 9' s. 35.4 k. cpl. 122 a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 21" TT. cl. Wickes )

The first Buchanan (DD-131) was launched 2 January 1919 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine sponsored by Mrs. Charles P. Wetherbee and commissioned 20 January 1919, Lieutenant H. H. J. Bensen in command.

Buchanan reported to Commander, Destroyer Force, at Guantanamo, Cuba, and was temporarily attached to Destroyer Squadron 2 until ordered to the Pacific Fleet in July 1919 for duty with Destroyer Flotilla 4. From 7 June 1922 until 10 April 1930 Buchanan was out of commission at San Diego. She then joined Destroyer Division 10, Destroyer Squadrons, Battle Force, and operated on the west coast in routine division, force, and fleet activities and problems. In the summer of 1934, after making a cruise to Alaska with ROTC units aboard, she was placed in reduced commission attached to Rotating Reserve Destroyer Squadron 20 at San Diego.

Again placed in full commission in December 1934, she resumed operations with Division 5, Destroyers, Battle Force. Buchanan was again out of commission at San Diego from 9 April 1937 until 30 September 1939. She was then refitted for action wit h Division 65, Destroyer Squadron 32, Atlantic Squadron, and from December 1939 until 22 February 1940 operated with the Neutrality Patrol and Antilles Detachment. She was then assigned to patrol in the Gulf of Mexico, operating out of Galveston, Tex., an d later off Key West and around the Florida Straits. She arrived at Boston Navy Yard 2 September and then proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where on 9 September 1940 she was decommissioned and transferred in the destroyer-land bases exchange to the Unite d Kingdom.

Commissioned in the Royal Navy on the day of transfer she was renamed HMS Campbeltown. Upon her arrival at Devonport, England, 29 September 1940, Campbeltown was allocated to the 7th Escort Group, Liverpool, in the Western Approaches Comm and. In January 1941 she was provisionally allocated to the Royal Netherlands Navy, but reverted to the Royal Navy in September 1941. Between September 1941 and March 1942 she served with Atlantic convoys and was attacked on several occasions by enemy U-b oats and aircraft, but escaped without damage. On 15 September 1941 she picked up the survivors of the Norwegian motor tanker Vinga, damaged by an enemy air attack.

Her end came as a fitting conclusion to her fine career for she acted as blockship in the lock entrance at St. Nazaire during the raid of 28 March 1942. Early that morning she was driven straight at her objective under withering fire. Her commandos scr ambled ashore and commenced their demolition work. After scuttling her, her crew escaped in motor boats. Eleven hours later, her five tons of delayed action high explosives blew up, inflicting heavy casualties among the German members of an inspection par ty who had gone on board and wrought great havoc in the port. Campbeltown's captain, Lieutenant Commander S. H. Beattie, R. N., who was taken prisoner of war, was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry.


Contents

The first USS Buchanan (DD-131) was launched on 2 January 1919 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine sponsored by Mrs. Charles P. Wetherbee. The ship was commissioned 20 January 1919 with Lieutenant H. H. J. Bensen in command. Buchanan reported to Commander, Destroyer Force, at Guantanamo, Cuba, and was temporarily attached to Destroyer Squadron 2 until ordered to the Pacific Fleet in July 1919 for duty with Destroyer Flotilla 4. From 7 June 1922 until 10 April 1930 Buchanan was out of commission at San Diego. She then joined Destroyer Division 10, Destroyer Squadrons, Battle Force, and operated on the West Coast in routine division, force, and fleet activities and problems. It was for this short period that she was commanded by Theodore E. Chandler, who would later become an admiral during World War II, and was killed in action in the South Pacific in January, 1945. In the summer of 1934, after making a cruise to Alaska with ROTC units aboard, she was placed in reduced commission attached to Rotating Reserve Destroyer Squadron 20 at San Diego.

Again placed in full commission in December 1934, she resumed operations with Division 5, Destroyers, Battle Force. Buchanan was again out of commission at San Diego from 9 April 1937 until 30 September 1939 at which time she was refitted for action with Division 65, Destroyer Squadron 32, Atlantic Squadron. From December 1939 until 22 February 1940, she operated with the Neutrality Patrol and Antilles Detachment. She was then assigned to patrol in the Gulf of Mexico, operating out of Galveston, Texas and later off Key West and around the Florida Straits. She arrived at Boston Navy Yard 2 September and then proceeded to Halifax, where on 9 September 1940 she was decommissioned and transferred to the United Kingdom under the Destroyers for Bases Agreement.


USS Buchanan (DD-131)/HMS Campbeltown


Figure 1: USS Buchanan (DD-131) at Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, 18 May 1936. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Buchanan (DD-131) underway on 26 February 1919. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Buchanan (DD-131) in port, probably at San Diego, California, circa the early 1920s. Note that the after 4"/50 gun is still mounted on her fantail. Also note the pattern of the numeral "3" painted on her bow. Courtesy of ESKC Joseph L. Aguillard, USNR, 1969. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: Destroyers in the Upper Chambers, Gatun Locks, during the Pacific Fleet's passage through the Panama Canal, 24 July 1919. Those present are: USS Wickes (Destroyer # 75) and USS Yarnall (Destroyer # 143), both at left USS Philip (Destroyer # 76), USS Buchanan (Destroyer # 131) and USS Elliot (Destroyer # 146), left to right in the center group USS Boggs (Destroyer # 136), USS Dent (Destroyer # 116) and USS Waters (Destroyer # 115), left to right in the right center group. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Aaron Ward (DD-132) photographed during the early 1920s, probably off the U.S. West Coast. USS Buchanan (DD-131) is at left. Courtesy of ESKC Joseph L. Aguillard, USNR, 1969. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: View of British sailors learning about their new ships, a part of the Lend-Lease agreement in September 1940. In the background are the USS Buchnanan (DD-131) and the USS Crowninshield (DD-134). Courtesy Tom Kerman. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 7: HMS Castleton (ex-USS Aaron Ward, DD-132) and HMS Campbeltown (ex-USS Buchanan, DD-131) alongside in Devonport Dockyard after arriving from the USA in September 1940. Courtesy Bob Hibbert. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 8: HMS Campbeltown (ex-USS Buchanan, DD-131) under refit prior to the St. Nazaire raid. The bridge has been stripped, armoured, and has some of the splinter matting in place. The forward 4in/50 has been replaced with a 12pounder gun. Courtesy Robert Hurst. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 9: HMS Campbeltown, disguised as a German destroyer for the famous raid on St. Nazaire, France, in 1942. Campbeltown was built as USS Buchanan (DD 131), one of hundreds of "four piper" or "flush deck" destroyers constructed during the World War I era. Buchanan was one of 50 such ships transferred to the UK under the "Destroyers for Bases" deal, becoming HMS Campbeltown on 9 September 1940. She served the Royal Navy as an escort until early 1942, when she was assigned a role in the St. Nazaire raid. Courtesy Joe Radigan. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 10: HMS Campbeltown grounded on dry dock sill moments before detonating. Courtesy Joe Radigan. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 11: HMS Campbeltown as seen from alongside the Normandie Dock shortly before she exploded. On the left is one of the two tankers present in the dry dock. When the destroyer exploded, both tankers were swept against the dock walls by the inrush of water and sank. Courtesy Bob Hibbert. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 12: Aerial photo taken some months after Operation Chariot. The Normandie Dock has been sealed and work is in progress restoring the facility. In the middle of the picture, the stern half of the Campbeltown sits on the bottom, the forward section having been blown to pieces. Courtesy Robert Hurst. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 13: The wrecked Campbeltown (her foreends towards the camera) inside the lock. Note the Normandie's docking blocks, the ruined caisson at the right rear of the lock and the sand wall sealing all. Courtesy Robert Hurst. Click on photograph for larger image.

USS Buchanan (DD-131) was a 1,090-ton Wickes class destroyer and was named after Admiral Franklin Buchanan (1800-1874), who played an important role in the US Navy prior to the Civil War and then was a leading figure in (ironically) the Confederate States Navy during the Civil War. Buchanan was built by the Bath Iron Works at Bath, Maine, and was commissioned 20 January 1919. The ship was approximately 314 feet long and 30 feet wide, had a top speed of 35 knots and had a crew of 122 officers and men. Buchanan was armed with four 4-inch guns, two 3-inch guns, 12 21-inch torpedo tubes and depth charges.

During the early part of her career, Buchanan patrolled both the Atlantic and the Caribbean for the US Navy. In May 1919, she assisted in providing route protection for the trans-Atlantic crossing of the Navy’s NC flying boats. Buchanan then was assigned to the Pacific Fleet and transited the Panama Canal in July 1919. The destroyer served along America’s West Coast until she was placed out of commission in June 1922.

Buchanan was re-commissioned in April 1930 and continued working in the Pacific for seven more years. She was decommissioned in April 1937 (as newer ships were brought into the fleet), but was once again re-commissioned at the end of September 1939. It was necessary to re-commission the old destroyer because the outbreak of World War II in Europe forced the United States to enlarge its Navy for neutrality enforcement purposes. For the remainder of 1939 and well into 1940, Buchanan operated in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. In early September 1940, Buchanan was sent to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where she was decommissioned and turned over to Great Britain as part of the famous “Lend-Lease” agreement, where fifty old American destroyers were given to England in exchange for basing rights in British possessions in the Western Hemisphere.

After its transfer to Great Britain, USS Buchanan became HMS Campbeltown in the Royal Navy. Campbeltown was initially based at Liverpool and served as an escort guarding the Western Approaches to Great Britain. She was transferred to the Royal Netherlands Navy in January 1941, but then was given back to the Royal Navy in September. Once back in the Royal Navy, Campbeltown resumed escorting convoys in the Atlantic, where she saw action against German U-boats and aircraft.

In January 1942, Campbeltown was selected to take part in “Operation Chariot,” which was the proposed commando attack on the German-occupied port of Saint-Nazaire, France. In 1942, the enormous German battleship Tirpitz was anchored at Trondheim, Norway, and was considered a major surface threat to merchant convoys headed for England. But, if the Tirpitz did enter the Atlantic, she would need a drydock big enough to handle her in case she was damaged or in need of repairs. The only drydock on Europe’s Atlantic seaboard that was large enough to accommodate Tirpitz was located at Saint-Nazaire. Originally built to service the huge French ocean liner SS Normandie, the drydock was now a vital military target.

The goal of Operation Chariot was to ram an old, expendable warship filled with explosives into the gates of the drydock. Accompanying this ship would be a number of small motor launches and motor torpedo boats filled with British commandos, whose mission was to destroy the drydock’s pumping and winding machinery. After the warship rammed into the drydock’s gates, the crew from the warship and the commandos were to be evacuated by the motor launches and the motor torpedo boats. After the commandos left, the explosives inside the warship would go off and the drydock would be destroyed. Needless to say, this was an extremely dangerous plan and its prospects for success seemed marginal, at best. But the Royal Navy thought it worth the risk if it kept Tirpitz out of the Atlantic and away from its merchant convoys.

Because of her age, HMS Campbelton was considered expendable and was selected as the ramming ship. On 10 March 1942, Campbelton arrived at Devonport, England, to be modified for this mission. All of her 4-inch guns were removed and replaced by a 12-pounder light automatic gun and eight 20-mm guns. Her depth-charge projectors and tracks also were removed and her bridge was protected with armor plating. Campbelton’s two after smoke stacks were removed and her two forward stacks were modified to resemble those of a German destroyer. This was done to confuse the Germans defending Saint-Nazaire into thinking she was a friendly German warship. The crew was reduced to just 75 men (under the command of Lieutenant Commander Stephen Beattie) and an explosive charge consisting of 24 depth charges containing a total of four tons of explosives was fitted into steel tanks just behind the steel pillar that supported her forward gun mount. The timed charges were set before the ship sailed and were cemented into place to prevent anyone from interfering with the detonation.

HMS Campbelton left Falmouth, England, on the afternoon of 26 March 1942 with only enough fuel for a one-way trip to France. She was escorted by a small flotilla of 18 motor launches and motor torpedo boats, along with two Hunt class destroyer escorts. The small task force made it successfully to France and the final attack on Saint-Nazaire began shortly after midnight on 28 March. The Campbelton and her escorts remained undetected until 0122 on 28 March, when searchlights illuminated the attacking ships. Campbelton increased speed to 19 knots and headed straight for the drydock gates under intense enemy fire. Numerous hits were made on the old destroyer but she kept on moving towards her objective. Then at 0134, Campbelton rammed the drydock’s gates, firmly wedging herself into position. Commandos and demolition parties went ashore in the face of heavy German fire and successfully planted demolition charges that destroyed the withdrawing machinery for opening the drydock’s gates and the pumping machinery for the drydock itself. Of the 611 men who took part in this operation, 169 (64 commandos and 105 sailors) were killed and 215 were captured. Only 222 were successfully evacuated by the surviving torpedo boats and motor launches that escorted Campbelton. Five other men made it to shore and successfully evaded capture by making an amazing journey through France to neutral Spain. The captain of Campbelton, Lieutenant Commander Stephen Beattie, was one of the men taken prisoner and later received the Victoria Cross for his part in the raid.

At first the Germans didn’t really know what to make of the attack. Campbelton was still wedged into the drydock’s gates and, even though the Germans searched the ship, nothing was found. Then at 1135 on the morning of 28 March, the hidden demolition charges on board Campbelton went off, creating an enormous explosion and causing the forward part of the ship to disintegrate. The huge blast killed approximately 300 Germans who were on board or around the ship and it destroyed the drydock’s gates, causing water to rush into the drydock and forcing what was left of the shattered destroyer into it. The explosion rendered the drydock at Saint-Nazaire unusable for the rest of the war and it wasn’t completely repaired until 1947. Tirpitz, therefore, would be unable to threaten Allied convoys in the Atlantic since it no longer had a usable drydock on the Atlantic seaboard.

Whether or not the raid on Saint-Nazaire was worth the price is debatable. The raid was technically a success, but it came at a very high price in human lives. In addition, with Allied naval and air power growing in strength throughout the region, one wonders if the Germans would have risked Tirpitz in the Atlantic even if the drydock at Saint-Naizaire were operational. After all, Tirpitz’s sister ship, Bismarck, also tried to enter the Atlantic to attack Allied shipping and didn’t succeed (even though HMS Hood was destroyed by Bismarck in the process). But the fact remains that Campbelton, which started life as a humble American destroyer, played a key role in one of the most daring, dangerous, and dramatic missions of World War II.


Mục lục

Buchanan được đặt lườn vào ngày 29 tháng 6 năm 1918 tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bath Iron Works ở Bath, Maine. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 2 tháng 1 năm 1919, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Charles P. Wetherbee, và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 20 tháng 1 năm 1919 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Đại úy Hải quân H. H. J. Bensen.

USS Buchanan Sửa đổi

Buchanan trình diện để hoạt động cùng Tư lệnh Lực lượng Khu trục tại Guantánamo, Cuba, và được tạm thời phối thuộc cùng Hải đội Khu trục 2 cho đến khi được lệnh điều động sang Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương vào tháng 7 năm 1919 và được phân về Chi hạm đội Khu trục 4. Từ ngày 7 tháng 6 năm 1922 đến ngày 10 tháng 4 năm 1930, Buchanan được cho xuất biên chế và nằm trong lực lượng dự bị tại San Diego. Sau đó nó gia nhập Đội khu trục 10 thuộc Hải đội Khu trục của Lực lượng Chiến trận, và hoạt động dọc theo vùng bờ Tây Hoa Kỳ trong các cuộc tập trận và cơ động thường lệ. Một thời gian ngắn trong giai đoạn này, chiếc tàu khu trục đặt dưới quyền chỉ huy của Theodore E. Chandler, trở thành Đô đốc trong Thế Chiến II và đã tử trận tại khu vực Nam Thái Bình Dương vào tháng 1 năm 1945. Vào mùa Hè 1934, sau khi thực hiện chuyến đi huấn luyện ôn tập đến Alaska cho nhân sự Hải quân Dự bị, nó được đưa về biên chế cắt giảm thuộc Hải đội Bị bị Luân phiên 20 tại San Diego.

Được đưa trở lại biên chế thường trực vào tháng 12 năm 1934, nó tiếp tục hoạt động cùng Đội 5 thuộc Hải đội Khu trục của Lực lượng Chiến trận. Buchanan lại được cho xuất biên chế tại San Diego từ ngày 9 tháng 4 năm 1937 cho đến ngày 30 tháng 9 năm 1939, khi nó được tái trang bị để hoạt động cùng Đội khu trục 65, Hải đội Khu trục 32 tại Đại Tây Dương. Từ tháng 12 năm 1939 đến ngày 22 tháng 2 năm 1940, nó tham gia các hoạt động Tuần tra Trung lập, được phân công tuần tra tại vịnh Mexico, hoạt động từ Galveston, Texas và sau đó ngoài khơi Key West, Florida và chung quanh eo biển Florida. Nó đi đến Xưởng hải quân Boston ngày 2 tháng 9, và sau đó tiếp tục đi đến Halifax, nơi mà vào ngày 9 tháng 9 năm 1940, nó được cho xuất biên chế và chuyển giao cho Anh Quốc theo Thỏa thuận đổi tàu khu trục lấy căn cứ.

HMS Campbeltown Sửa đổi

Được chính thức nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh, HMS Campbeltown thực hiện chuyến đi từ Halifax đến Plymouth, ngang qua St. Johns, Newfoundland. Nó đi đến xưởng tàu Devonport vào ngày 29 tháng 9, và bắt đầu được cải biến cho phù hợp việc phục vụ cùng Hải quân Anh. Công việc kéo dài trong suốt tháng 10, và sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy vào ngày 1 tháng 11, nó gia nhập Chi hạm đội Khu trục 17 hoạt động tại Khu vực tiếp cận phía Tây. Ngày hôm sau, nó gặp tai nạn va chạm với chiếc SS Risoy, và bị hư hại, nhưng vẫn tiếp tục an toàn đi đến Liverpool, nơi nó được sửa chữa từ ngày 7 tháng 11 đến ngày 24 tháng 11, rồi lại gia nhập chi hạm đội. Vào ngày 29 tháng 11, nó va chạm với chiếc tàu buôn MV Fiddown tại cửa sông Mersey. [2] Nó bắt đầu được bố trí cùng chi hạm đội vào đầu tháng 12, nhưng đến ngày 3 tháng 12, lại mắc tai nạn va chạm với chiếc SS Comus và bị buộc phải quay về cảng để sửa chữa lần nữa. Công việc sửa chữa kép dài cho đến cuối tháng 3 năm 1941, bao gồm việc cắt ngắn ống khói thứ tư.

Sau khi hoàn tất công việc vào ngày 28 tháng 3, Campbeltown được chuyển cho Hải quân Hoàng gia Hà Lan mượn, nơi nó gia nhập Đội hộ tống 7 và được bố trí cùng đơn vị này trong tháng 4-tháng 5. Hà Lan dự định đổi tên nó thành Middelburg, nhưng điều này không được chấp nhận do mâu thuẫn với thỏa thuận đặt tên với Hải quân Mỹ. Nó trải qua một đợt cải biến và sửa chữa khác trong suốt tháng 6, rồi tiếp tục nhiệm vụ cùng đội hộ tống vận tải trong tháng 7-tháng 8. Nó được đề nghị để hoàn trả cho Hải quân Hoàng gia vào tháng 9, nhưng tiếp tục ở lại cùng Đội hộ tống 7. Vào ngày 15 tháng 9, nó vớt những người sống sót từ chiếc tàu Na Uy Vingavốn bị hư hại do không kích. Cùng với thủy thủ đoàn người Anh, nó gia nhập trở lại đội hộ tống vào tháng 10, bảo vệ các đoàn tàu vận tải đi lại giữa Anh và Tây Phi trong tháng 11-tháng 12 trước khi chuyển đến Devonport để sửa chữa.

Cuộc đột kích St. Nazaire Sửa đổi

Campbeltown bắt đầu được sửa chữa tại Devonport vào tháng 1 năm 1942. Trong thời gian này, nó được chọn cho một chiến dịch đặc biệt, nên được rút khỏi hoạt động thường lệ để cải biến. Vào đầu năm 1942, thiết giáp hạm Đức Tirpitz neo đậu tại Trondheim, Na Uy đã sẵn sàng hoạt động và trở thành một mối đe dọa cho các đoàn tàu vận tải vượt Đại Tây Dương. Nếu Tirpitz tiến vào Đại Tây Dương, ụ tàu Louis Joubert tại St. Nazaire, nguyên được chế tạo để bảo trì chiếc tàu biển chở hành khách SS Normandie, là ụ tàu duy nhất do Đức kiểm soát tại bờ biển châu Âu của Đại Tây Dương đủ lớn để bảo trì chiếc thiết giáp hạm. [3] Nếu ụ tàu này ngừng hoạt động, một chuyến xuất kích của Tirpitz ra Đại Tây Dương sẽ nguy hiểm hơn, một điều khiến Hải quân Đức phải cân nhắc. [4]

Chiến dịch Chariot, cuộc tấn công ụ tàu ở St. Nazaire, là một kế hoạch húc một con tàu chất thuốc nổ vào cửa ụ tàu. Đi kèm theo nó sẽ là một số tàu nhỏ chở lính biệt kích Anh, sẽ phá hủy máy móc, máy bơm và thiết bị khác của ụ tàu. Lực lượng sau đó sẽ được triệt thoái bởi các con tàu nhỏ trước khi khối thuốc nổ trên tàu kích nổ. Một điểm khó khăn đặc biệt là vị trí của ụ tàu ở cách nhiều dặm bên trong cửa sông Loire. Là một tàu khu trục lạc hậu, Campbeltown được xem có thể phế bỏ và được chọn làm con tàu húc. Nó trải qua việc cải biến suốt tháng 2, tháo dỡ ống khói thứ ba và thứ tư, đồng thời hai ống khói còn lại được làm nghiêng nhằm mô phỏng cấu trúc và dáng vẽ một xuồng phóng lôi lớp Raubvogel của Đức. Một khẩu pháo 12-pounder được trang bị phía trước, và tám khẩu pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm được bổ sung ở sàn trên. Một lớp giáp bổ sung được cung cấp để tăng cường bảo vệ cầu tàu, đồng thời mọi dự trữ và thiết bị không cần thiết được tháo dỡ để làm nhẹ con tàu.

Một khối thuốc nổ bao gồm 24 quả mìn sâu Mark VII, chứa tổng cộng 4,5 tấn thiếu (4,1 t) thuốc nổ amatol, được đặt vào các thùng thép bố trí ngay phía sau các cột chống thép nâng đỡ khẩu pháo tận cùng phía trước. Các liều thuốc nổ được kích hoạt bởi nhiều kíp nổ bút chì trì hoãn 8 giờ được nối với nhau bởi dây cordtex, được hẹn giờ ngay trước khi khởi hành và được hàn kín để ngăn cản mọi ảnh hưởng bên ngoài đến việc kích nổ. [5] Campbeltown đi từ Devonport đến Falmouth, Cornwall vào ngày 25 tháng 3 để gặp gỡ các con tàu khác cùng tham gia chiến dịch. Thủy thủ đoàn, vốn sẽ phải rút lui cùng với lực lượng biệt kích, được giảm xuống còn 75 người dưới quyền chỉ huy của Thiếu tá Hải quân Stephen Halden Beattie.

Hải đội, bao gồm 21 con tàu: Campbeltown, 16 xuồng máy đổ bộ Fairmile B, một xuồng phóng lôi và một xuồng pháo Fairmile C hoạt động như sở chi huy của chiến dịch, rời Falmouth lúc 14 giờ 00 ngày 26 tháng 3 năm 1942, được hộ tống trong hầu hết chặng hành trình vượt sang Pháp bởi hai tàu khu trục hộ tống lớp "Hunt". [6] Ngoài một cuộc đụng độ ngắn với tàu ngầm U-593, khi hạm trưởng chiếc tàu ngầm báo cáo sai về hướng đi và thành phần của lực lượng đột kích, các con tàu đi đến Pháp mà không gặp trở ngại. Một xuồng máy đổ bộ bị gặp trục trặc cơ khí và bị buộc phải quay trở lại Anh.

Cuộc không kích chuẩn bị do 35 máy bay Armstrong Whitworth Whitley và 25 máy bay Vickers Wellington thực hiện qua đám mây dày tỏ ra yếu kém so với kế hoạch và không có hiệu quả, lại gây sự báo động đối với lực lượng phòng vệ là có điều gì bất thường đang diễn ra. Tuy nhiên, nhờ phát ra tín hiệu nhận diện nguyên bản của Đức, lực lượng có Campbeltown dẫn đầu treo cờ hiệu của Hải quân Đức Quốc xã, đã tiếp cận cảng không đầy 1 dặm (1,6 km) trước khi bị nhắm bắn. Là mục tiêu lớn nhất, Campbeltown bị thu hút nhiều hỏa lực nhất. Ở giai đoạn tiếp cận sau cùng, thủy thủ của nó hạ lá cờ Đức và giương cao lá cờ của Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh.

Lúc 01 giờ 34 phút ngày 28 tháng 3, bốn phút trễ hơn so với kế hoạch, Campbeltown húc vào cửa ụ tàu. Lính biệt kích và thủy thủ đổ bộ lên bờ dưới hỏa lực nặng nề của quân Đức, cài chất nổ phá hoại các máy móc của ụ tàu. Có 162 người thiệt mạng (64 lính biệt kích và 105 thủy thủ) trong tổng số 611 người của lực lượng đột kích. Trong số những người sống sót, 215 người bị bắt làm tù binh và 222 người triệt thoái được nhờ các xuồng đổ bộ còn sống sót. Có thêm năm người khác lẫn trốn không bị bắt, đi lẻn qua Pháp và Tây Ban Nha để cuối cùng đến được Gibraltar, một lãnh thổ do Anh kiểm soát. [7]

Khối thuốc nổ trên Campbeltown phát nổ vào trưa ngày hôm sau 28 tháng 3, một giờ rưỡi sau thời hạn cuối cùng mà người Anh hy vọng nó phải kích nổ. Cho dù con tàu đã được người Đức xem xét, khối thuốc nổ đã không bị phát hiện. Vụ nổ đã làm thiệt mạng khoảng 250 binh lính Đức và nhân viên dân sự người Pháp, làm phá hủy toàn bộ phần nữa phía trước của chiếc tàu khu trục lẫn 160 tấn thiếu (150 t) thùng chắn của ụ tàu nước tràn vào ụ tàu đã đẩy toàn bộ những gì còn lại của chiếc tàu khu trục vào bên trong ụ. Ụ tàu St. Nazaire đã không còn có thể sử dụng cho đến hết chiến tranh, và chỉ được sửa chữa vào năm 1947. [8]

Các quả ngư lôi nổ chậm được các xuồng phóng lôi phóng vào cửa bên ngoài của ụ tàu ngầm đã phát nổ theo như kế hoạch vào đêm 30 tháng 3, đã gây ra sự hoảng loạn đối với binh lính Đức vì họ tưởng rằng biệt kích Anh vẫn còn lại trong thị trấn, khiến chúng nổ súng bắn vào thường dân Pháp và bắn lẫn nhau. Có mười sáu thường dân Pháp thiệt mạng và khoảng ba mươi người bị thương. Sau đó, 1.500 thường dân bị bắt vào một trại tập trung tại Savenay, hầu hết nhà cửa của họ đều bị phá hủy, cho dù họ chẳng có liên hệ gì với vụ đột kích. [9] Thiếu tá Beattie, người bị bắt làm tù binh, được tặng thưởng huân chương Chữ thập Victoria do thành tích dũng cảm, và đến năm 1947 được tặng thưởng Bắc đẩu bội tinh của Pháp. [10] Huân chương Chữ thập Victoria này là một trong số năm huân chương được trao cho những người tham gia cuộc đột kích, cùng với 80 tặng thưởng khác.

Chiếc chuông của HMS Campbeltown được trao tặng cho thị trấn Campbelltown, Pennsylvania, một hành động nhằm ghi nhớ sự giúp đỡ của Hoa Kỳ trong chương trình Thỏa thuận đổi tàu khu trục lấy căn cứ. Chiếc chuông sau đó được chuyển cho chiếc HMS Campbeltown hiện dịch, một tàu frigate Kiểu 22, khi nó nhập biên chế năm 1989, [11] và được hoàn trả vào ngày 21 tháng 6 năm 2011 sau khi HMS Cambeltown được cho xuất biên chế. [12]

Bộ phim Gift Horse năm 1952 đã dựa một phần trên sự kiện của chiếc HMS Campbeltown. [13]


The USS CHARLES F. ADAMS has been taken off donation hold by the Navy after over 12 years of dedicated efforts by ACVA and JHNSA to make the ship a ship museum in Jacksonville, In spite of many updated submissions to NAVSEA they did not approve the ship donation and it is going to be scrapped. The ACVA Board has voted to dissolve ACVA as a non-profit entity and apply our funds to create an Adams Class Ship Memorial that is being planned with JHNSA.

The USS Buchanan was named for Franklin Buchanan , a Captain in the United States Navy and an Admiral in the Confederate States Navy.

Buchanan is one of three Adams class DDG's commisioned during the centennial of the Civil War that were named after Confederate naval officers.

The USS Buchanan DDG 14 was the 13th shi p in the Adams Class and the Third ship to bear the name sake. The first was DD 131 and the second DD 484

USS Buchanan at anchor in Seychelles in 1987

Photo By Tony Kitchen Lt.
  • April 1962
  • – arrived in home port San Diego for first time
  • 1962
  • -Part shakedown training included taking part in USS Arizona Monument Dedication May 31, 1962
  • 1963
  • - Toured Australia May of 1963 stopping at several cities to have tours so the Australian people could see what the Guided Missile Destroyers looked like that they were purchasing from US.
  • 1963 June
  • Credited for saving life of Chinese sailor (Yunglai Chu) aboard National Chinese Merchant Union Carrier. By provided needed medical attention
  • 1964
  • – Movie was made aboard BUCHANAN for Navy to show Destroyers effectiveness in the fleet " BUCHANAN WHO NEEDS YOU"
  • 1965
  • the BUCHANAN, with the other three destroyers in COMDESDIV 152 steamed north of the DMZ many times at night on re-con missions this was the first US Naval missions north of the DMZ since the MADDOX and TURNER JOY
  • 1965 - During second West Pac was awarded Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
  • 1966 July - BUCHANAN was Flagship for Commander, SEVENTH FLEET during his official visit to Bangkok, Thailand - Took part in Sea Dragon and Naval Gunfire Support in Vietnam. Hit By North Vietnamese gunfire on May 29, 1968 when receiving heavy counter battery from CD Site S-246 in Vicinity of WF02553635 ( UTM) during operation Sea Dragon. Received damage to forward mast SPS -37 Antenna No Casualties.
  • 1968 - She received call for fire from a Marine base North of Da Nang. Was credited with saving day with rapid and accurate Naval Gunfire Support
  • 1969 - With COMDESDIV 15 aboard. Took part in NAVEL GUNFIRE SUPPORT South Vietnam. In April helped suppress the take over of a Marine Base in hills surrounding Da Nang.
  • 1972– Was on DMZ when Vietnam Easter Offensive started. Provided Naval Gunfire support for Major Ripley at Dong Ha Bridge, and downed pilots. Was credited with 5 tank kills. April 6 took the war North OPERATION FREEDOM TRAIN. On April 17, 1972 BUCHANAN was hit by North Vietnamese shore fire. Seaman Davis was KIA and seven wounded. BUCHANAN took part in operation Line Backer II taking part on strikes on Hiaphong Harbor clearing SAM sites so the harbor could be mined. Buchanan replaced barrels and repaired battle damage in Da Nang from USS Hector was First time in Vietnam war for US ship to be serviced in war zone.
  • 1972 – Buchanan became Mod Squad One of three destroyers in Pacific , six Navy wide to be made "Mod Squad". This was an Admiral Zummwald program to reward outstanding performing officers with commands of larger ships than their rank would normally receive Lt. Commander as skipper instead of Commander
  • 1973 October - Buchanan was on Picket duty on "Yankee Station " when force was ordered to abandon Yankee Station and proceed to Indian Ocean This was last force to Man "Yankee Station"
  • 1974 - Received Arleigh Burk award for most improved Destroyer Navy wide
  • 1978 (September?) - Port of call in Matzetlan, Mexico. During port visit, the ship’s pier which was crowded with cotton bales catches fire. Ship’s crew assists the poorly equipped local fire department and does the lion’s share of fighting the fire, using the ship’s fire fighting equipment. Receives a letter of gratitude from the city.
  • 1985 - In early 1985, the Reagan administration selected the Buchanan, with its Nuclear Capable ASROC, to test the new Non-nuclear policies instituted by New Zealand. Permission to enter was denied causing the US State Department to cut off all intelligence to the Kiwis and canceled all future military maneuvers. America also would no longer sit at the ANZUS table with Kiwi reps.
  • March 1985 – Buchanan was attacked while leaving Sidney Harbor by a Green peace activist with motorized hand glider and paint bombs.
  • 1987 - Deployed to North Arabian Sea Part of the Ranger Battle Group located just outside of the Persian Gulf during the Iran / Iraq war.
  • 1989. Deployed WestPac/Indian Ocean. Participated in Operation EARNEST WILL by escorting reflagged Kuwati tankers through the Straits of Hormuz
  • Decommissioned Oct 1, 1991 At San Diego

Would like to hear from any crewmen, relatives or anyone connected
with the USS Buchanan over the years

We solicit any materials you may wish to loan for use at this site. All materials will be copied and returned to the owner. We also appreciate any information about the ship or the ship's company you are willing to share especially the whereabouts of those who have served aboard the Buchanan. Please click here to email the USS Buchanan Webmaster.

USS Buchanan Specifications

Displacement 4,500 tons (full load)
Length 437 feet
Beam 47 feet
Max Speed 30 knots
Power Plant 4 - 1200 psi boilers 2 geared turbines
2 shafts 70,000 shaft horsepower
Aircraft None - VERTREP capable only
Armament Standard Missiles (MR)
Harpoon (from Standard launcher)
ASROC (from MK 16 launcher)
6 - MK 46 torpedoes (from 2 triple tube mounts)
2 - 5-inch / 54 caliber MK 42 gun
Complement 383 (20 officers, 363 enlisted)


Service with the Royal Navy - HMS Campbeltown (I42)

Upon her arrival at HMNB Devonport, England, on 29 September 1940, HMS Campbeltown was allocated to the 7th Escort Group, Liverpool, in the Western Approaches Command. In January 1941 she was provisionally allocated to the Royal Netherlands Navy, but reverted to the Royal Navy in September 1941. Between September 1941 and March 1942 she served with Atlantic convoys and was attacked on several occasions by enemy U-boats and aircraft, but escaped without damage. On 15 September 1941 she picked up the survivors of the Norwegian motor tanker Vinga, damaged by an enemy air attack.

Saint-Nazaire Raid

In 1942, the German battleship   Tirpitz anchored at Trondheim in Norway was considered to present a grave threat to Atlantic convoys. However, should the ship enter the Atlantic then the dry dock originally built for the ocean liner SS   Normandie in the German-occupied port of Saint-Nazaire, France, was the only one in German hands on the Atlantic seaboard large enough to hold her. [1] It was considered that if this dock could be put out of action, then a sortie by Tirpitz into the Atlantic would be much more dangerous for her, and probably not worth the risk. [2] The obsolete Campbeltown was selected for the task, and cosmetic modifications quickly done to make her look similar to a German Möwe-class torpedo boat.

Using genuine German recognition signals, the force approached to within less than a mile of the harbour before they were fired upon, Campbeltown as the largest target drawing most of the fire. At 01:34 on 28 March 1942, Campbeltown rammed the dock gate four minutes later than planned. Troops and crew came ashore under heavy German fire and set about demolishing the dock machinery. 169 of the raiders were killed (64 commandos and 105 sailors) out of the 611 men in the attacking force. Of the survivors, 215 were captured and 222 were evacuated by the surviving small craft. A further five evaded capture and travelled overland through France to Spain and then to Gibraltar. [3]

The charges in Campbeltown exploded the next day, 28 March, an hour and a half after the latest time that the British had expected them to detonate. Although the ship had been searched by the Germans, the explosives had not been detected. The explosion killed around 250 German soldiers and French civilians and demolished both the front half of the ship and the 160-ton caisson, the inrush of water into the dock washing the remains of the ship into it. The dock was rendered unusable for the rest of the war, and was not repaired until 1947. [4]


DD-131 Buchanan

The first Buchanan (DD-131) was launched 2 January 1919 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine sponsored by Mrs. Charles P. Wetherbee and commissioned 20 January 1919, Lieutenant H. H. J. Bensen in command.

Buchanan reported to Commander, Destroyer Force, at Guantanamo, Cuba, and was temporarily attached to Destroyer Squadron 2 until ordered to the Pacific Fleet in July 1919 for duty with Destroyer Flotilla 4. From 7 June 1922 until 10 April 1930 Buchanan was out of commission at San Diego. She then joined Destroyer Division 10, Destroyer Squadrons, Battle Force, and operated on the west coast in routine division, force, and fleet activities and problems. In the summer of 1934, after making a cruise to Alaska with ROTC units aboard, she was placed in reduced commission attached to Rotating Reserve Destroyer Squadron 20 at San Diego.

Again placed in full commission in December 1934, she resumed operations with Division 5, Destroyers, Battle Force. Buchanan was again out of commission at San Diego from 9 April 1937 until 30 September 1939. She was then refitted for action wit h Division 65, Destroyer Squadron 32, Atlantic Squadron, and from December 1939 until 22 February 1940 operated with the Neutrality Patrol and Antilles Detachment. She was then assigned to patrol in the Gulf of Mexico, operating out of Galveston, Tex., an d later off Key West and around the Florida Straits. She arrived at Boston Navy Yard 2 September and then proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where on 9 September 1940 she was decommissioned and transferred in the destroyer-land bases exchange to the Unite d Kingdom.

Commissioned in the Royal Navy on the day of transfer she was renamed HMS Campbeltown. Upon her arrival at Devonport, England, 29 September 1940, Campbeltown was allocated to the 7th Escort Group, Liverpool, in the Western Approaches Comm and. In January 1941 she was provisionally allocated to the Royal Netherlands Navy, but reverted to the Royal Navy in September 1941. Between September 1941 and March 1942 she served with Atlantic convoys and was attacked on several occasions by enemy U-b oats and aircraft, but escaped without damage. On 15 September 1941 she picked up the survivors of the Norwegian motor tanker Vinga, damaged by an enemy air attack.

Her end came as a fitting conclusion to her fine career for she acted as blockship in the lock entrance at St. Nazaire during the raid of 28 March 1942. Early that morning she was driven straight at her objective under withering fire. Her commandos scr ambled ashore and commenced their demolition work. After scuttling her, her crew escaped in motor boats. Eleven hours later, her five tons of delayed action high explosives blew up, inflicting heavy casualties among the German members of an inspection par ty who had gone on board and wrought great havoc in the port. Campbeltown's captain, Lieutenant Commander S. H. Beattie, R. N., who was taken prisoner of war, was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry.


USS Preble DLG-15/DDG-46

Webmaster - T. Bateman
gmm1 - 1979/1982

]
Early 1980's Bumper Sticker - Contributed by Barry Bengel

Links to Preble's sister ships

Links to the rest of the Cold War Era DDG's

Looking for a Preble Baseball Cap (or any other ship you served on for that matter)? While it's not one of the original ones, this is a very nice cap that includes a silhouette of the ship on it. They can put either DLG-15 and DDG-46 on the hat depending on your preference. They go for $29.95 and can be found at militarygifts.com. You can also buy Polo Shirts, T-Shirts, Sweatshirts, and Satin Jackets with the same embroidery.

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This page was last updated on 11/22/2020
Copyright 1997 - 2021 by Tom Bateman


Buchanan DD- 131 - History

Gleaves- (Bristol-) class Buchanan was laid down with Aaron Ward at Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey, 11 February 1941. The two ships were also launched on the same day, 22 November, and Buchanan commissioned 21 March 1942.

After shakedown, the &ldquoBuke&rdquo transited the Panama Canal and arrived in the South Pacific. Attached to Destroyer Squadron 12, her first tour included the entire Solomon Islands phase of the war:

  • In the Guadalcanal campaign August 1942&ndashJanuary 1943, supported landings at Tulagi and nearby Gavutu and Tanambogo with Monssen and cruiser San Juan, 7&ndash9 August 1942, rescued survivors following the Battle of Savo Island on 9 August and participated with Farenholt, Laffey, Duncan and McCalla of her squadron in the Battle of Cape Esperance on 11&ndash12 October.
  • In the New Georgia campaign through October 1943, Buchanan supported the invasion of Rendova and New Georgia in June&ndashJuly and participated the Battle of Kolombangara on 13 July, during which she damaged her bow in collision with Woodworth.
  • In the Bougainville campaign, November 1943&ndashJanuary 1944, she sank Japanese submarine RO-37 and in the following Bismarcks operation in February&ndashMarch, she participated in her squadron&rsquos raids on Rabaul and Kavieng, in which she was hit by shore battery fire.

Following a West Coast overhaul, her only one of the war, Buchanan supported the invasion of the Palaus in September&ndashOctober 1944, screened carrier operations against enemy targets in the Philippines, Formosa and South China Sea areas in December 1944 and January 1945, supported the operations at Iwo Jima, February&ndashMarch, and Okinawa March&ndashMay, and then screening strikes by the Fifth and Third Fleets against the Japanese home islands.

Buchanan&rsquos final wartime assignment was at Tokyo Bay. In August 1945, she, Lansdowne and Lardner, the three DesRon 12 ships present, were assigned to escort Admiral Nimitz&rsquos flagship South Dakota into Japanese waters. In the following days, Buchanan transported Adm. Nimitz and Adm. Halsey around the bay then, on 2 September, she ferried Gen. MacArthur and his party to and from Missouri for the surrender ceremony. Throughout September, she continued to operate in support of the occupation effort before departing for the United States, where she arrived in October.

Decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina, in May 1946, Buchanan remained in the reserve fleet for 2½ years. In December 1948, she was placed back in commission in preparation for transfer to Turkey. Recommissioned in 1949 as Gelibolu, she served as the Turkish Navy as until 1976.


Watch the video: USS Buchanan DDG-14 Sinking SINKEX, RIMPAC 2000 (May 2022).