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Arch of San Damiano in Carsulae, Italy

Arch of San Damiano in Carsulae, Italy


Arch of San Damiano, City of Carsulae, Terni

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According to Franciscan sources, a miracle in which Saint Francis' heard an exhortation from Christ occurred in 1205 in this church: [1]

One day out in the countryside to meditate. Finding himself near San Damiano, which threatened ruin, old as it was, driven by the impulse of the Holy Spirit, he entered to pray. Kneeling in prayer before the image of the Crucifix, he was invaded with a great spiritual consolation and, as he affixed his tearful eyes on the cross of the Lord, with the ears of his body he heard a voice descend to him from the cross and say three times Francis, go and repair my church which, as you see, is all in ruins!. On hearing that voice, Francis remained astonished and trembling, being in the church alone and, perceiving in his heart the power of divine language, felt kidnapped of his senses. Finally returning to his senses, he girded himself to obey, concentrated everything on the mission to repair the church of walls, although the divine word was referring principally to the Church which Christ purchased by his blood, as the Holy Spirit had made him understand and how he later revealed to his fellow brothers.

Afterwards Saint Francis took action to physically repair the structure of the San Damiano church, although he eventually realized that God's message to him was to restore the entire Catholic Church as a whole body rather than literally repair one stone structure. The San Damiano cross which was said to speak to Francis currently hangs in the Basilica of Saint Clare in Assisi.

Other artworks in the church include a 14th-century Madonna with Child between Sts. Damian and Rufinus fresco, located in the apse.

This convent became the home of Saint Clare of Assisi and her followers in 1212. [2] Work was carried out to provide buildings for this religious community. [2] The Sisters stayed until Clare's death in 1253 when it was thought too dangerous to remain and it was exchanged with the Canons of San Rufino for the chapel of San Giorgio. [2] The convent is open free of charge to the public. Downstairs off the cloister is the refectory in its original state. [2] A fresco in the refectory recalls the visit of Pope Gregory IX when he asked Clare to bless the loaves, which is said to have resulted in crosses appearing on the loaves. [2] Upstairs is St. Clare's Oratory where the Blessed Sacrament was kept, and [2] next to this is the dormitory. [2] A cross marks the place where Clare died on 11 August 1253. [2]


Job Posting: Scientific/Staff Director – Archaeological Excavation of the Roman Baths (San Gemini, Italy)

Position: Scientific and staff director for the Archaeological Excavation of the Roman Baths in the ancient city of Carsulae in San Gemini, (Umbria) Italy.
Professor Jane Whitehead, current director of archaeological excavations, along with the Associazione Valorizzazione del Patrimonio Storico and the San Gemini Preservation Studies Program (SGPS) are searching for a new scientific director for the excavation of the Roman Baths in the ancient city of Carsuale in San Gemini, Italy.
Professor Whitehead, who has directed the Carsulae excavation since 2004, is planning her retirement and, together with the excavation’s partner organizations, is searching for a new scientific director and partner university who would phase into that position over a period of three years.
Position Description:

  1. Scientific direction of the excavation
  2. Maintaining official contacts with the Soprintendenza Archeologica dell’Umbria
  3. Direction of excavation staff
  4. Public relations for the excavation both in Italy and in North America

In finding a new director for the excavation, we also hope to find a university that is interested in the San Gemini programs. We are looking to collaborate with an institution on the archeological development of the baths at Carsulae and also on a multi-disciplinary study of cultural heritage involving several departments, including archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, and architectural preservation.
We would therefore request that those individuals qualified and interested in this position present to us the ways their department and university would be interested in participating in this project.
Requirements of Director of Excavation:


Arch of San Damiano in Carsulae, Italy - History


Distance: 3 mi - 5 km
Approximate Time: 8 mins

Carsulae is an archaeological site in Umbria, central Italy, now one of the most important archaeological ruins in Italy.

Most historians fix the town's official founding to about 300 BC. Carsulae's growth into a major town only took place, however, with the building of the ancient Roman road, the via Flaminia, in 220-219-BC. Carsulae probably originated as a mansio, a rest stop and watering place for travelers, traders and soldiers.
When the via Flaminia was built, its western branch proceeded north from Narni, sparking the development not only of Carsulae, but also of Acquasparta and Bevagna. This branch of the road courses through a gently rolling upland plain at the foot of the Martani mountain range, an area that had been heavily populated since the middle of the Bronze Age. The eastern branch proceeded from Narni to Terni, north to Spoleto, then past Trevi and finally to Foligno, where it merged with the western branch.
In due course, during the age of Emperor Augustus, Carsulae became a Roman municipium. During his reign a number of major works wewre begun, eventually including the amphitheatre, most of the forum, and the marble-clad Arch of Trajan (now called the Arco di San Damiano).
During its "golden age" Carsulae, supported by agricultural activity in the surrounding area, was prosperous and wealthy. Its bucolic setting, its large complex of mineralized thermal baths, theatres, temples and other public amenities, attracted wealthy and even middle class "tourists" from Rome.
However, while all the other mentioned towns and cities on the two branches of the old Roman road continue to exist, nothing but ruins remains of Carsulae, which was abandoned, and once abandoned, never resettled. The only subsequent building that took place occurred in paleo-Christian times, about the 4th or 5th century, at the southerly entrance to Carsulae, where the church of San Damiano, still standing today, was built for a small community of nuns on the foundations of an earlier Roman building.
For centuries after it was deserted, Carsulae was used as a quarry for building materials that were used elsewhere, such as in Spoleto or Cesi, where Roman tombstones may be seen built into the church of S. Andrea, but otherwise, it was left alone. Consequently, archaeologists have been able to map the city with considerable detail.
No one knows the precise reasons why Carsulae was abandoned, but two that seem most plausible are first, that it was almost destroyed and the site made inhospitable by an earthquake, and second that it lost its importance and as a result became increasingly impoverished because most of the important north-south traffic used the faster east branch of the via Flaminia. J.B. Ward-Perkins suggested another effect of increasingly unsettled times from the third century, when the very trunk roads that had been economic lifelines became access roads for hordes of unpaid fighters: "Henceforth the tendency must have been to move away from the roads, until by the Middle Ages the roads themselves were as bare of settlement as they had been when they were first built."
Haphazard excavations took place in the 16th century under the direction of Duke Federico Cesi, whose palazzi are in Cesi Acquasparta, and in the 17th century under the direction of Pope Pius VI, but not until 1951 were the ruins subjected to methodical archaeological exploration and documentation. Significant additional work was also done in 1972. There is a current excavation run by Professor Jane Whitehead through Valdosta State University of Georgia focusing on the bath complex and pre-Roman polygonal wall south of the city. They are in their fifth season with plans to continue.

  1. Via Flaminia. The western branch of the ancient Roman road passed through Carsulae. The via Flaminia was the "main street" of the city, and the stretch that runs through the city features sidewalks and gutters.
  2. Chiesa di San Damiano, first built in paleo-Christian times on the remains of a Roman building whose original purpose is unknown. Remnants of this building are still in evidence on the south side of the church. The primitive church was a rectangular space with an apse. A portico and two interior colonnades were added during the 11th century using materials gathered from the site, including items that probably decorated the Basilica or were architectural pieces from the Forum.
  3. Basilica, the public meeting hall for the citizens of Carsulae. The interior hall, which is rectangular, has a central nave and two side aisles separated by rows of columns. The apse at the far end would have held a magistrate's chair, used to arbitrate or adjudicate disputes and dispense justice.
  4. Public Baths, mineralized, thermal baths.
  5. Cistern, now an Antiquarium, held water for use by the people of the town.
  6. Temples. Two temples, sometimes called the "twin temples" were devoted to the gods of two unknown Roman divinities. Only their diases, sheathed in pink rock, remain today.
  7. The Forum, the main public "square" of the ancient city, built on a terraced structure in and around the Basilica and twin temples. The line of vaulted structures, or "tabernae", near the Forum might have been market stalls or shops.
  8. Public buildings. Used for unknown purposes, they probably housed administrative offices for the local government, or served as palaces for aristocratic families. There are four sumptuously decorated rectangular rooms with apses, with marble walls and floors incorporating both marble and opus sectilis.
  9. Amphitheatre. Sitting in a natural depression to the east of the via Flaminia, was probably built during the Flavian dynasty. It is built primarily of layers of limestone blocks and bricks.
  10. Theatre. It was probably built in the time of Augustus, before the building of the amphitheatre. The primary building material for the theatre was opus reticulatum.
  11. Collegium Iuvenum, a college or school for young people.
  12. Cistern - Another structure built to contain water for the use of citizens.
  13. Arco di Traiano - Arch of San Damiano - Originally consisting of three marble- clad arches, of which only the center arch remains. It was also built during the time of Augustus as a symbolic north entrance to the city.
  14. Funerary monument, known as the tumulus, a much restored funerary monument of an aristocratic family, possibly the Furia family. A plaque now kept at the museum in the Palazzo Cesi in Acquasparta may have been taken from this monument.
  15. Funerary monument - a less distinguished monument in the necropolis of Carsulae.

Monuments [ edit ]

    . The western branch of the ancient Roman road passed through Carsulae. The via Flaminia was the "main street" of the city, and the stretch that runs through the city features sidewalks and gutters.
  1. Chiesa di San Damiano, first built in paleo-Christian times on the remains of a Roman building whose original purpose is unknown. Remnants of this building are still in evidence on the south side of the church. The primitive church was a rectangular space with an apse. A portico and two interior colonnades were added during the 11th century using materials gathered from the site, including items that probably decorated the Basilica or were architectural pieces from the Forum. , the public meeting hall for the citizens of Carsulae. The interior hall, which is rectangular, has a central nave and two side aisles separated by rows of columns. The apse at the far end would have held a magistrate's chair, used to arbitrate or adjudicate disputes and dispense justice.
  2. Public Baths, mineralized, thermal baths.
  3. Cistern, now an Antiquarium, held water for use by the people of the town.
  4. Temples. Two temples, sometimes called the "twin temples" were devoted to the gods of two unknown Roman divinities. Only their diases, sheathed in pink rock, remain today.
  5. The Forum, the main public "square" of the ancient city, built on a terraced structure in and around the Basilica and twin temples. The line of vaulted structures, or "tabernae", near the Forum might have been market stalls or shops.
  6. Public buildings. Used for unknown purposes, they probably housed administrative offices for the local government, or served as palaces for aristocratic families. There are four sumptuously decorated rectangular rooms with apses, with marble walls and floors incorporating both marble and opus sectilis. . Sitting in a natural depression to the east of the via Flaminia, was probably built during the Flavian dynasty. It is built primarily of layers of limestone blocks and bricks.
  7. Theatre. It was probably built in the time of Augustus, before the building of the amphitheatre. The primary building material for the theatre was opus reticulatum.
  8. Collegium Iuvenum, a college or school for young people.
  9. Cistern - Another structure built to contain water for the use of citizens.
  10. Arco di Traiano - Arch of San Damiano - Originally consisting of three marble- clad arches, of which only the center arch remains. It was also built during the time of Augustus as a symbolic north entrance to the city.
  11. Funerary monument, known as the tumulus, a much restored funerary monument of an aristocratic family, possibly the Furia family. A plaque now kept at the museum in the Palazzo Cesi in Acquasparta may have been taken from this monument.
  12. Funerary monument - a less distinguished monument in the necropolis of Carsulae.

Portico of San Damiano, Carsulae, Terni, Umbria

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During the Carolingian period San Damiano was a village built around a monastery under the supervision of Saint Ambrose of Milan. [2] In a document dating to the year 853, San Damiano housed a church dedicated to Saints Cosmas and Damian. [3] During the Middle Ages the town did not host any important events. By the 14th century, the town still existed. [4] [5] In the 16th century a local parish was built by Saint Charles Borromeo, alas San Damiano did not join the parish given its population would be forced to pay a fee for the parish priest's allowance. San Damiano remained in the parish of San Gerardo in Monza. [6] By 1751 it was a separate municipality with 75 inhabitants administered by a consul elected by the population. [7] In 1805, with the proclamation of the napoleonic Kingdom of Italy the number of residents was 178. [5] In 1809, the town was under the control of Napoleon and its jurisdiction was merged with Monucco's, then together merging with the one of Monza in 1811. On 12 February 1816 the Austrians re-established it as an independent municipality and it remained so for 50 years. [5] In 1853 San Damiano had 363 inhabitants. [5] In 1863 it was renamed San Damiano of Monza [5] but in 1866 the commune was annexed definitively to the new town of Brugherio after a strong debate. [8] The mayor of Baraggia (future mayor of Brugherio) convinced the citizens of San Damiano to merge with the new municipality.

San Damiano is under the control of Sant'Albino's parish that is from the administrative point of view under Monza's supervision, [9] [10] but from the perspective of the religious community under the pastoral Epiphany of the Lord in Brugherio. [11] The Church of Saint Anne can be found on the village's land.

In San Damiano there are three schools that are part of the Istituto Comprensivo Via Nazario Sauro: Fratelli Grimm kindergarten, Corridoni primary school and Eduardo De Filippo secondary school. [12]


5 Roman Ruins in Umbria, Italy

Umbria is one of the smallest regions of Italy that usually lies in the shadow of its majestic neighbor, Tuscany. However, this land is home to many more Roman ruins than its neighboring region, due to its proximity to Rome. Its importance for the Roman Empire was mainly due to the fact that very important Roman roads, especially Via Flaminia, crossed its territory. Via Flaminia was a road that connected Rome to the Adriatic Sea, supplied Rome and also served as military highway into and out of Rome.

You will be able to find many Roman churches very well-preserved, and plenty of bridges, theaters and amphitheaters that have survived until our times (and probably will continue to stand proud long after we are gone) due to the amount of stone and the quality of the concrete used for their constructions. Here are the top 5 roman ruins in Umbria, Italy:

Roman Bridge, Narni

The Roman Bridge that can be found at Narni is one of the most spectacular and fascinating Roman sights in central Italy, an architectural masterpiece that was built across the Nera river. Via Flaminia passed through Narni, and so the city was very important for the Roman Empire. The bridge was built in 23 BC by Emperor Augustus, and it became the point where Via Flaminia crossed over the Nera river. The Bridge of Augustus, how it is also known, is the longest Roman bridge ever constructed and it is about 30 meters high. Today, half of it is still standing.

Carsulae

Carsulae is one of the most important and complex archaeological ruins in Italy. The site was founded in 300 BC, but it reached its peak only after Via Flaminia was built through the town, between 220-219 BC. It was considered to be a rest stop for soldiers, travelers and traders.

During the reign of Augustus, it became a municipium. A number of new buildings were erected. Some of the most important ones were the amphitheater, the forum and a marble-clad Arch of Trajan, known today as Arco di San Damiano. The golden age of the city materialized into a large complex of mineral baths, temples, theaters and other public and private buildings.

Today you can see the ruins of Via Flaminia, the main street of the town, which is a collection of footpaths and gutters, thermal baths, two twin temples, the forum, the remains of some public buildings, the basilica (the public meeting hall for the citizens of Carsulae), the amphitheater, which was probably built during the Flavian dynasty, and a theater built during the ruling of Augustus, so before the amphitheater.

The Collegium Iuvenum, which was a school for young people, is also visible, as well as two cisterns that were meant to contain water, and a funerary monument which belonged to an aristocratic family.

During the 4th or 5th century, at the southerly entrance of Carsulae, on the foundation of an unknown Roman building, the church of San Damiano was built, meant to accommodate a small community of nuns. Today this church is still visible.

Roman Amphitheater, Assisi

The Roman amphitheater of Assisi is situated in Porta Pelici, one of the eight gates of the town. Porta Pelici dates back to the 12th century, but you can still notice the structure of a Roman amphitheater that was built in the 1st century AD. It has an elliptical form which is visible between the garden wall that delimits the area of the ancient Assisi from the medieval structures. The garden is actually set on the former arena, and you can still see a travertine arch.

Roman Theater, Gubbio

The town of Gubbio is situated 40 km from Perugio and about 65 km from Urbino, on the lower slopes of Mt. Ingino. Its Roman theater was built during the 1st century BC from local limestone, and it was the second largest theater in the Roman empire, after the theater of Marcellus in Rome.

The arena has an interior diameter of 70 m and an outer diameter of 110 m. Due to its size, many have mistaken this structure for an amphitheater. The theater is situated below Gubbio center and today is a venue for open-air performances and an observation point for those who want to capture beautiful views of the town.

Roman Ruins in Spoleto

Spoleto is an enchanting medieval town that charms every traveler not only with its Middle Age stories and architectural masterpieces, but also with an impressive number of Roman ruins. The town dates back to ancient times, being first inhabited by the Umbri people, and then by the Romans. It became a colony in 241 BC, its central position making it very important for the Roman Empire.

The Romans left many fascinating structures behind, that are still visible today. The most remarkable ones, that are very well-preserved and help you picture the ancient look of the town are:

Roman theater – it is a reconstruction of the original theater, and today is a scene for summer events and houses the National Archaeological Museum

Ponte Sanguinario (Bloody Bridge) – dates back to the 1st century it is in an impressive state, but is situated today below ground level however, you can still visit it the name comes from the Roman times, when Christians were persecuted in the amphitheater situated nearby.

Roman amphitheater – dates from the 2nd century AD and it was converted in a fortress by Totila in 545 you can still see the Minervio barracks, long sections of the lower ambulacrum and a part of the upper ambulacrum

Casa Romana – it is situated next to the Palazzo Comunale and dates from the 1st century AD it was restored during the 2nd century AD and inhabited until the Early Middle Ages

Basilica of San Salvatore – dates from the 4th or 5th century AD and includes a cella of a Roman Temple it is one of the most important examples of Early Christian architecture in the world.

Did you enjoy reading about the top 5 roman ruins in Umbria, Italy? Leave us a comment below!


Portico of San Damiano church, city of Carsulae

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Watch the video: SPECIALE MADONNA DELLE ROSE A SAN DAMIANO (November 2021).