News

USS Alabama BB-60 - History

USS Alabama BB-60 - History

USS Alabama BB-60

Alabama

III

(BB 60: dp. 35, 000, 1. 680', b. 108'2", dr. 36'2", s. 27.5 k., cpl. 1, 793; a. 9 16", 20 5"; 24 40mm., Z 20mm.; cl. South Dakota)

The third Alabama (BB 60) was laid down on 1 February 1940 by the Norfolk (Va.) Navy Yard; launched on 16 February 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Lister Hill, wife of the senior Senator from Alabama; and commissioned on 16 August 1942, Capt. George B. Wilson in command.

After fitting out, Alabama commenced her shakedown cruise in Chesapeake Bay on Armistice Day (11 November) 1942. As the year 1943 began, the new battleship headed north to conduct operational training out of Casco Bay, Maine. She returned to Chesapeake Bay on 11 January 1943 to carry out the last week of shakedown training. Following a period of availability and logistics support at Norfolk Alabama was assigned to Task Group (TG) 22.2, and returned do Casco Bay for tactical maneuvers on 13 February 1943.

With the movement of substantial British strength toward the Mediterranean theater, to prepare for the invasion of Sicily, the Royal Navy lacked the heavy ships necessary to cover the northern convoy routes. The British appeal for help on those lines soon led to the temporary assignment of Alabama and South Dakota (BB 57) to the Home Fleet.

On 2 April 1943, Alabama-as part of Task Force (TF) 22— sailed for the Orkney Islands with her sister ship and a screen of five destroyers. Proceeding via Little Placentia Sound Argentia, Newfoundland, the battleship reached Scapa Flow on 19 May 1943, reporting for duty with TF 61 and becoming a unit of the British Home Fleet. She soon embarked on a period of intensive operational training to coordinate joint operations.

Early in June, Alabama and her sister ship, along with British Home Fleet units, covered the reinforcement of the garrison on the island of Spitzbergen, which lay on the northern flank of the convoy route to Russia, in an operation that took the ship across the Arctic Circle. Soon after her return to Scapa Flow, she was inspected by Admiral Harold R. Stark, Commander United States Naval Forces, Europe.

Shortly thereafter, in July, Alabama participated in Operation "Governor," a diversion aimed toward southern Norway, to draw German attention away from the real Allied thrust, toward Sicily. It had also been devised to attempt to lure out the German battleship Tirpitz, the sister ship of the famed, but shortlived, Bismarck, but the Germans did not rise to the challenge and the enemy battleship remained in her Norwegian lair.

Alabama was detached from the British Home Fleet on l August 1943, and, in company with South Dakota and screening destroyers, sailed for Norfolk, arriving there on 9 August. For the next ten days, Alabama underwent a period of overhaul and repairs. This work completed, the battleship departed Norfolk on 20 August 1943 for the Pacific. Transiting the Panama Canal five days later, she dropped anchor in Havannah Harbor, at Efate in the New Hebrides, on 14 September.

Foliowing a month and a half of exercises and training, with fast carrier task groups, the battleship moved to Fiji on 7 November. Alabama sailed on 11 November to take part in Operation "Galvanic", the assault on the Japanese-held Gilbert Islands. She screened the fast carriers as they launched attacks on Jaluit and Mille atoHs, Marshall Islands, to neutralize Japanese airfields located there. Alabama supported landings on Tarawa on 20 November and later took part in the securing of Betio and Makin. On the night of 26 November, Alabama twice opened fire to drive off enemy aircraft that approached her formation.

On 8 December 1943, Alabama, along with five other fast battleships, carried out the first Pacific gunfire strike conducted by that type of warship. Alabama's guns hurled 535 rounds into enemy strongpoints, as she and her sister ships bombarded Nauru Island, an enemy phosphate-producing center, causing severe damage to shore installations there. She also took the destroyer Boyd (DD 544), alongside after that ship had received a direct hit from a Japanese shore battery on Nauru, and brought three injured men on board for treatment.

She then escorted the carriers Bunker Hill (CV-17) and Monterey (CVL-26) back to Efate, arriving on 12 December. Alabama departed the New Hebrides for Pearl Harbor on 5 January 1944, arrived on the 12th, and underwent a brief drydocking at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard. After replacement of her port outboard propeller, and routine maintenance, Alabama was again underway to return to action in the Pacifie.

Alabama reached Funafuti, Ellice Islands, on 21 January 1944 and there rejoined the fleet. Assigned to Task Group (TG) 58.2 which was formed around Essex (CV-9), Alabama left the Ellice Islands on 25 January to help carry out Operation "Flintlock," the invasion of the Marshall Islands. Alabama, along with sister ship South Dakota and the fast battleship North Carolina (BB-55), bombarded Roi on 29January and Namur on 30January she hurled 330 rounds of 16-inch and 1, 562 of 5-inch toward Japanese targets, destroying planes, airfield facilities, blockhouses, buildings, and gun emplacements. Over the following days of the campaign, Alabama patroled the area north of Kwajalein Atoll. On 12 February 1944, Alabama sortied with the Bunker Hill task group to launch attacks on Japanese installations, aircraft and shipping at Truk. Those raids, launched on 16 and 17 February, caused heavy damage to enemy shipping concentrated at that island base.

Leaving Truk, Alabama began steaming toward the Marianas to assist in strikes on Tinian, Saipan and Guam. During this action, while repelling enemy air attacks on 21 February 1944, 5-inch mount no. 9 accidentally fired into mount no. 5. Five men died, and 11 were wounded in the mishap.

After the strikes were completed on 22 February, Alabama conducted a sweep looking for crippled enemy ships southeast of Saipan, and eventually returned to Majuro on 26 February 1944. There she served temporarily as flagship for Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, Commander, TF 58, from 3 to 8 March.

Alabama's next mission was to screen the fast carriers as they hurled air strikes against Japanese positions on Palau, Yap Ulithi, and Woleai, Caroline Islands. She steamed from Majuro on 22 March 1944 with TF 58 in the screen of Yorktown (CV-10) On the night of 29 March, about six enemy planes approached TG 58.3, in which Alabama was operating, and four broke off to attack ships in the vicinity of the battleship. Alabama downed one unassisted, and helped in the destruecion of another.

On 30 March, planes from TF 58 began bombing Japanese airfields, shipping, fleet servicing facilities, and other installations on the islands of Palau, Yap, Ulithi and Woleai. During that day, Alabama again provided antiaircraft fire whenever enemy planes appeared. At 2045 on the 30th a single plane approached TG 58.3, but Alabama and other ships drove it off before it could cause any damage.

The battleship returned briefly to Majuro, before she sailed on 13 April with TF 58, this time in the screen of Enterprise (CV - ). In the next three weeks, TF 58 hit enemy targets on Hollandia Wakde, Sawar, and Sarmi along the New Guinea coast, covered Army landings at Aitape, Tanahmerah Bay, and Humboldt Bay and conducted further strikes on Truk.

As part of the preliminaries to the invasion of the Marianas Alabama, in company with five other fast battleships, shelled the large island of Ponape, in the Carolines, the site of a Japanese airfield and seapIane base. As Alabama's Caut. Fred T Kirtland subsequently noted, the bombardment, of 70 minutes; duration, was conducted in a "leisurely manner. " Alabama then returned to Majuro on 4 May 1944 to prepare for the invasion of the Marianas.

After a month spent in exercises and refitting, Alabama again got under way with TF 58 to participate in Operation "Forager. " On 12 June, Alaharna screened the carriers striking Saipan. On 13 June, Alabama took part in a six-hour preinvasion bombardment of the west coast of Saipan, to soften the defenses and cover the initial minesweeping operations. Her spotting planes reported that her salvoes had caused great destruction and fires in Garapan town. Though the shelling appeared successful, it proved a failure due to the lack of specialized training and experience required for successful shore bombardent. Strikes continued as troops invaded Saipan on 15 June.

On 19 June, during the Battle of the Philippine Sea Alabama operated with TG 58.7, providing antiaircraft support for the fast carriers against attacking Japanese aircraft. The ships of TF 58 claimed 27 enemy planes downed during the course of the action which later came to be known as the "Marianas Turkey Shoot."

In the first raid that approached Alabama's formation, only two planes managed to penetrate to attack her sistership South Dakota, scoring one bomb hit that caused minor damage. An hour later a second wave, composed largely of torpedo bombers bore in, but Alabama's barrage discouraged two planes from attacking South Dakota. The intense concentration paid to the incoming torpedo planes left one dive bomber nearly undetected and it managed to drop its load near Alabama; the two small bombs were near-misses, and caused no damage.

American submarines sank two Japanese carriers and Navy pilots claimed a third carrier. American pilots and antiaircraft gunners had seriously depleted Japanese naval air power. Out of the 430 planes with which the enemy had commenced the Battle of the Philippine Sea, only 35 remained operational afterward.

Alabama continued patrolling areas around the Marianas to protect the American landing forces on Saipan, screening the fast carriers as they struck enemy shipping, aircraft, and shore installations on Guam, Tinian, Rota, and Saipan. She then retired to the Marshalls for upkeep.

Alabama—as flagship for Rear Admiral E. W. Hanson

Commander, Battleship Division 9—left Eniwetok on 14 July 1944, sailing with the task group formed around Bunker Hill. She screened the fast carriers as they conducted preinvasion attacks and support of the landings on the island of Guam on 21 July. She returned briefly to Eniwetok on 11 August. On 30 August she got underway in the screen of Essex to carry out Operation "Stalemate II the seizure of Palau, Ulithi, and Yap. On 6 through 8 september, the forces launched strikes on the Carolines.

Alabama departed the Carolines to sail to the Philippines and provided cover for the carriers striking the islands of Cebu Leyte, Bohol, and Negros from 12 to 14 September. The carriers launched strikes on shipping and installations in the Manila Bay area on 21 and 22 September, and in the central Philippines area on 24 September. Alabama retired briefly to Salpan on 28 September then proceeded to Ulithi on 1 October 1944.

On 6 October 1944 Alabama sailed with TF 38 to support the liberation of the Phiiippines. Again operating as part of a fast carrier task group, Alabama protected the flattops while they launched strikes on Japanese facilities at Okinawa, in the Pescadores, and Formosa.

Detached from the Formosa area on 14 October to sail toward Luzon, the fast battleship again used her antiaircraft batteries in support of the carriers as enemy aircraft attempted to attack the formation. Alabama's gunners claimed three enemy aircraft shot down and a fourth damaged. By 15 October, Alabama was supporting landing operations on Leyte. She then screened the carriers as they conducted air strikes on Cebu, Negros, Panay northern Mindanao, and Leyte on 21 October 1944.

Alabama, as part of the Enterprise screen, supported air operations against the Japanese Southern Force in tfie area off Surigao Straut, then moved north to strike the powerful Japanese Central Force heading for San Bernardino Strait. After receiving reports of a third Japanese force, the battleship served in the screen of the fast carrier task force as it sped to Cape Engano. On 24 October, although American air strikes destroyed four Japanese carriers in the Battle off Cape Engano, the Japanese Central Force under Admiral Kurita had transited San Bernardino Strait and emerged off the coast of Samar, where it fell upon a task group of American escort carriers and their destroyer and destroyer escort screen. Alabama reversed her course and headed for Samar to assist the greatlv yutnumbered American forces, but the Japanese had retreated by the time she reached the scene. She then joined the protective screen for the Essex task group to hit enemy forces in the central Philippines before retiring to Ulithi on 30 October 1944 for replenishment.

Underway again on 3 November 1944, Alabama screened the

fast carriers as they carried out sustained strikes against Japan-

ese airfields, and installations on Luzon to prepare for a landing on Mindoro Island. She spent the next few weeks engaged in operating against the Visayas and Luzon before retiring to Ulithi on 24 November.

The first half of December 1944 found Alabama engaged in various training exercises and maintenance routines. She left Ulithi on 10 December, and reached the launching point for air strikes on Luzon on 14 December as the fast carrier task forces launched aircraft to carry out preliminary strikes on airfields on Luzon that could threaten the landings slated to take place on Mindoro. From 14 to 16 December a veritable umbrella of carrier aircraft covered the Luzon fields, preventing any enemy planes from getting airborne to challenge the Mindoro-bound convoys. Having completed her mission, she left the area to refuel on 17 December, but, as she reached the fueling rendezvous, began encountering heavy weather. By daybreak on the 18th, rough seas and harrowing conditions rendered a fueling at sea impossible, 50 knot winds caused ships to roll heavily. Alabama experienced rolls of 30 degrees, had both her Vought ''Kingfisher''floatplanes so badly damaged that they were of no further value, and received minor damage to her structure. At one point in the typhoon, Alabama recorded wind gusts up to 83 knots. Three destroyers, Hull (DD-350), Monaghan (DD 354) and Spence (DW-512), were lost to the typhoon. By 19 December the storm had run its course, and Alabama arrived back at Ulithi on 24 December. After pausing there briefly, Alabama continued on to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, for overhaul.

The battleship entered drydock on 18 January 1945, and remained there until 25 February. Work continued until 17 March when Alabama got underway for standardization trials and refresher training along the southern California coast. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on 4 April, arrived there on 10 April

and held a week of training exercises. She then continued on to Ulithi and moored there on 28 April 1945.

Alabama departed Ulithi with TF 58 on 9 May 1945, bound for the Ryukyus, to support forces which had landed on Okinawa on 1 April 1945, and to protect the fast carriers as they launched air strikes on installations in the Ryukyus and on Kyushu. On 14 May, several Japanese planes penetrated the combat air patrol to get at the carriers; one crashed Vice Admiral Mitscher's flagship. Alabama's guns splashed two, and assisted in splashing two more

Subsequently, Alabama rode out a typhoon, on 4 and 5 June suffering only superficial damage while the nearby heavy cruiser Pittsburgh (CA-70) lost her bow. Alabama subsequently bombarded the Japanese island of Minami Daito Shima, with other fast battleships, on 10 June 1945 and then headed for Leyte Gulf later in June to prepare to strike at the heart of Japan with the 3d Fleet.

On 1 July 1945, Alabama and other 3d Fleet units got underway for the Japanese home islands. Throughout the month of July 1945, Alabama carried out strikes on targets in industrial areas of Tokyo and other points on Honshu, Hokkaido, and Kyushu; on the night of 17 and 18 July, Alabama, and other fast battleships in the task group, carried out the first night bombardment of six major industrial plants in the Hitachi-Mito area of Honshu, about eight miles northeast of Tokyo. On board Alabama to observe the operation was retired Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, the famed polar explorer.

On 9 August, Alabama transferred a medical party to the destroyer Ault (DD - 98), for further transfer to the destroyer Borze (DD-704). The latter had been kamikazied on that date and required prompt medical aid on her distant picket station.

The end of the war found Alahama still at sea, operating off the southern coast of Honshu. On 15 August 1945, she received word of the Japanese capitulation. During the initial occupation of the Yokosuka-Tokyo area, Alabama tranferred detachments of marines and bluejackets for temporary duty ashore, her bluejackets were among the first from the fleet to land. She also served in the screen of the carriers as they conducted reconnaissance flights to locate prisoner-of-war camps.

Alabama entered Tokyo Bay on 5 September to receive men who had served with the occupation forces, and then departed Japanese waters on 20 September. At Okinawa, she embarked 700 sailors—principally members of Navy construction battalions (or "Seabees"—for her part in the "Magic Carpet" operations. She reached San Francisco at mid-day on 15 October, and on Navy Day (27 October 1945) hosted 9, 000 visitors. She then shifted to San Pedro, Calif., on 29 October. Alabama remained at San Pedro through 27 February 1946, when she left for the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for inactivation overhaul. Alabama was decommissioned on 9 January 1947, at the Naval Station, Seattle, and was assigned to the Bremerton Group, United States Pacific Reserve Fleet. She remained there until struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 June 1962.

Citizens of the state of Alabama had formed the "USS Alabama Battleship Commission" to raise funds for the preservation of Alabama as a memorial to the men and women who served in World War II. The ship was awarded to that state on 16 June 1964, and was formally turned over on 7 July 1964 in ceremonies at Seattle. Alabama was then towed to her permanent berth at Mobile, Ala., arriving in Mobile Bay on 14 September 1964.

Alabama received nine battle stars for her World War II service.


U.S.S. ALABAMA

The Navy brought USS Alabama into service with her commission in August 1942. For her first year of service, she patrolled Atlantic waters guarding against German movements. In August 1943, the ship reported for duty in the Pacific. During the late part of that year, the ship participated in the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. The following year saw her in action at the Marshall Islands, the Marianas, and Leyte. USS Alabama participated in the Battles of the Philippine Sea and the Leyte Gulf. She had parts in raids in other parts of the Pacific as well.

Early 1945 saw the ship getting an overhaul and participating in training missions. She returned to action to participate in attacks on the Japanese islands. She was there to occupy Japan after the surrender. After the war, she helped bring troops home to the West Coast. The Navy decommissioned her in January 1947. The ship’s second home was as part of the Reserve Fleet for the next fifteen years. In June 1962, the Navy removed USS Alabama from the Naval Vessel Register. A couple of years later, the ship became the property of the State of Alabama. The state berthed the ship permanently at Mobile, Alabama and she remains there today.


USS Alabama BB-60 - History

(BB 60: dp. 35, 000, 1. 680', b. 108'2", dr. 36'2", s. 27.5 k., cpl. 1, 793 a. 9 16", 20 5" 24 40mm., Z 20mm. cl. South Dakota)

The third Alabama (BB 60) was laid down on 1 February 1940 by the Norfolk (Va.) Navy Yard launched on 16 February 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Lister Hill, wife of the senior Senator from Alabama and commissioned on 16 August 1942, Capt. George B. Wilson in command.

After fitting out, Alabama commenced her shakedown cruise in Chesapeake Bay on Armistice Day (11 November) 1942. As the year 1943 began, the new battleship headed north to conduct operational training out of Casco Bay, Maine. She returned to Chesapeake Bay on 11 January 1943 to carry out the last week of shakedown training. Following a period of availability and logistics support at Norfolk Alabama was assigned to Task Group (TG) 22.2, and returned do Casco Bay for tactical maneuvers on 13 February 1943.

With the movement of substantial British strength toward the Mediterranean theater, to prepare for the invasion of Sicily, the Royal Navy lacked the heavy ships necessary to cover the northern convoy routes. The British appeal for help on those lines soon led to the temporary assignment of Alabama and South Dakota (BB 57) to the Home Fleet.

On 2 April 1943, Alabama-as part of Task Force (TF) 22— sailed for the Orkney Islands with her sister ship and a screen of five destroyers. Proceeding via Little Placentia Sound Argentia, Newfoundland, the battleship reached Scapa Flow on 19 May 1943, reporting for duty with TF 61 and becoming a unit of the British Home Fleet. She soon embarked on a period of intensive operational training to coordinate joint operations.

Early in June, Alabama and her sister ship, along with British Home Fleet units, covered the reinforcement of the garrison on the island of Spitzbergen, which lay on the northern flank of the convoy route to Russia, in an operation that took the ship across the Arctic Circle. Soon after her return to Scapa Flow, she was inspected by Admiral Harold R. Stark, Commander United States Naval Forces, Europe.

Shortly thereafter, in July, Alabama participated in Operation "Governor," a diversion aimed toward southern Norway, to draw German attention away from the real Allied thrust, toward Sicily. It had also been devised to attempt to lure out the German battleship Tirpitz, the sister ship of the famed, but shortlived, Bismarck, but the Germans did not rise to the challenge and the enemy battleship remained in her Norwegian lair.

Alabama was detached from the British Home Fleet on l August 1943, and, in company with South Dakota and screening destroyers, sailed for Norfolk, arriving there on 9 August. For the next ten days, Alabama underwent a period of overhaul and repairs. This work completed, the battleship departed Norfolk on 20 August 1943 for the Pacific. Transiting the Panama Canal five days later, she dropped anchor in Havannah Harbor, at Efate in the New Hebrides, on 14 September.

Foliowing a month and a half of exercises and training, with fast carrier task groups, the battleship moved to Fiji on 7 November. Alabama sailed on 11 November to take part in Operation "Galvanic", the assault on the Japanese-held Gilbert Islands. She screened the fast carriers as they launched attacks on Jaluit and Mille atoHs, Marshall Islands, to neutralize Japanese airfields located there. Alabama supported landings on Tarawa on 20 November and later took part in the securing of Betio and Makin. On the night of 26 November, Alabama twice opened fire to drive off enemy aircraft that approached her formation.

On 8 December 1943, Alabama, along with five other fast battleships, carried out the first Pacific gunfire strike conducted by that type of warship. Alabama's guns hurled 535 rounds into enemy strongpoints, as she and her sister ships bombarded Nauru Island, an enemy phosphate-producing center, causing severe damage to shore installations there. She also took the destroyer Boyd (DD 544), alongside after that ship had received a direct hit from a Japanese shore battery on Nauru, and brought three injured men on board for treatment.

She then escorted the carriers Bunker Hill (CV-17) and Monterey (CVL-26) back to Efate, arriving on 12 December. Alabama departed the New Hebrides for Pearl Harbor on 5 January 1944, arrived on the 12th, and underwent a brief drydocking at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard. After replacement of her port outboard propeller, and routine maintenance, Alabama was again underway to return to action in the Pacifie.

Alabama reached Funafuti, Ellice Islands, on 21 January 1944 and there rejoined the fleet. Assigned to Task Group (TG) 58.2 which was formed around Essex (CV-9), Alabama left the Ellice Islands on 25 January to help carry out Operation "Flintlock," the invasion of the Marshall Islands. Alabama, along with sister ship South Dakota and the fast battleship North Carolina (BB-55), bombarded Roi on 29January and Namur on 30January she hurled 330 rounds of 16-inch and 1, 562 of 5-inch toward Japanese targets, destroying planes, airfield facilities, blockhouses, buildings, and gun emplacements. Over the following days of the campaign, Alabama patroled the area north of Kwajalein Atoll. On 12 February 1944, Alabama sortied with the Bunker Hill task group to launch attacks on Japanese installations, aircraft and shipping at Truk. Those raids, launched on 16 and 17 February, caused heavy damage to enemy shipping concentrated at that island base.

Leaving Truk, Alabama began steaming toward the Marianas to assist in strikes on Tinian, Saipan and Guam. During this action, while repelling enemy air attacks on 21 February 1944, 5-inch mount no. 9 accidentally fired into mount no. 5. Five men died, and 11 were wounded in the mishap.

After the strikes were completed on 22 February, Alabama conducted a sweep looking for crippled enemy ships southeast of Saipan, and eventually returned to Majuro on 26 February 1944. There she served temporarily as flagship for Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, Commander, TF 58, from 3 to 8 March.

Alabama's next mission was to screen the fast carriers as they hurled air strikes against Japanese positions on Palau, Yap Ulithi, and Woleai, Caroline Islands. She steamed from Majuro on 22 March 1944 with TF 58 in the screen of Yorktown (CV-10) On the night of 29 March, about six enemy planes approached TG 58.3, in which Alabama was operating, and four broke off to attack ships in the vicinity of the battleship. Alabama downed one unassisted, and helped in the destruecion of another.

On 30 March, planes from TF 58 began bombing Japanese airfields, shipping, fleet servicing facilities, and other installations on the islands of Palau, Yap, Ulithi and Woleai. During that day, Alabama again provided antiaircraft fire whenever enemy planes appeared. At 2045 on the 30th a single plane approached TG 58.3, but Alabama and other ships drove it off before it could cause any damage.

The battleship returned briefly to Majuro, before she sailed on 13 April with TF 58, this time in the screen of Enterprise (CV - ). In the next three weeks, TF 58 hit enemy targets on Hollandia Wakde, Sawar, and Sarmi along the New Guinea coast, covered Army landings at Aitape, Tanahmerah Bay, and Humboldt Bay and conducted further strikes on Truk.

As part of the preliminaries to the invasion of the Marianas Alabama, in company with five other fast battleships, shelled the large island of Ponape, in the Carolines, the site of a Japanese airfield and seapIane base. As Alabama's Caut. Fred T Kirtland subsequently noted, the bombardment, of 70 minutes duration, was conducted in a "leisurely manner. " Alabama then returned to Majuro on 4 May 1944 to prepare for the invasion of the Marianas.

After a month spent in exercises and refitting, Alabama again got under way with TF 58 to participate in Operation "Forager. " On 12 June, Alaharna screened the carriers striking Saipan. On 13 June, Alabama took part in a six-hour preinvasion bombardment of the west coast of Saipan, to soften the defenses and cover the initial minesweeping operations. Her spotting planes reported that her salvoes had caused great destruction and fires in Garapan town. Though the shelling appeared successful, it proved a failure due to the lack of specialized training and experience required for successful shore bombardent. Strikes continued as troops invaded Saipan on 15 June.

On 19 June, during the Battle of the Philippine Sea Alabama operated with TG 58.7, providing antiaircraft support for the fast carriers against attacking Japanese aircraft. The ships of TF 58 claimed 27 enemy planes downed during the course of the action which later came to be known as the "Marianas Turkey Shoot."

In the first raid that approached Alabama's formation, only two planes managed to penetrate to attack her sistership South Dakota, scoring one bomb hit that caused minor damage. An hour later a second wave, composed largely of torpedo bombers bore in, but Alabama's barrage discouraged two planes from attacking South Dakota. The intense concentration paid to the incoming torpedo planes left one dive bomber nearly undetected and it managed to drop its load near Alabama the two small bombs were near-misses, and caused no damage.

American submarines sank two Japanese carriers and Navy pilots claimed a third carrier. American pilots and antiaircraft gunners had seriously depleted Japanese naval air power. Out of the 430 planes with which the enemy had commenced the Battle of the Philippine Sea, only 35 remained operational afterward.

Alabama continued patrolling areas around the Marianas to protect the American landing forces on Saipan, screening the fast carriers as they struck enemy shipping, aircraft, and shore installations on Guam, Tinian, Rota, and Saipan. She then retired to the Marshalls for upkeep.

Alabama—as flagship for Rear Admiral E. W. Hanson

Commander, Battleship Division 9—left Eniwetok on 14 July 1944, sailing with the task group formed around Bunker Hill. She screened the fast carriers as they conducted preinvasion attacks and support of the landings on the island of Guam on 21 July. She returned briefly to Eniwetok on 11 August. On 30 August she got underway in the screen of Essex to carry out Operation "Stalemate II the seizure of Palau, Ulithi, and Yap. On 6 through 8 september, the forces launched strikes on the Carolines.

Alabama departed the Carolines to sail to the Philippines and provided cover for the carriers striking the islands of Cebu Leyte, Bohol, and Negros from 12 to 14 September. The carriers launched strikes on shipping and installations in the Manila Bay area on 21 and 22 September, and in the central Philippines area on 24 September. Alabama retired briefly to Salpan on 28 September then proceeded to Ulithi on 1 October 1944.

On 6 October 1944 Alabama sailed with TF 38 to support the liberation of the Phiiippines. Again operating as part of a fast carrier task group, Alabama protected the flattops while they launched strikes on Japanese facilities at Okinawa, in the Pescadores, and Formosa.

Detached from the Formosa area on 14 October to sail toward Luzon, the fast battleship again used her antiaircraft batteries in support of the carriers as enemy aircraft attempted to attack the formation. Alabama's gunners claimed three enemy aircraft shot down and a fourth damaged. By 15 October, Alabama was supporting landing operations on Leyte. She then screened the carriers as they conducted air strikes on Cebu, Negros, Panay northern Mindanao, and Leyte on 21 October 1944.

Alabama, as part of the Enterprise screen, supported air operations against the Japanese Southern Force in tfie area off Surigao Straut, then moved north to strike the powerful Japanese Central Force heading for San Bernardino Strait. After receiving reports of a third Japanese force, the battleship served in the screen of the fast carrier task force as it sped to Cape Engano. On 24 October, although American air strikes destroyed four Japanese carriers in the Battle off Cape Engano, the Japanese Central Force under Admiral Kurita had transited San Bernardino Strait and emerged off the coast of Samar, where it fell upon a task group of American escort carriers and their destroyer and destroyer escort screen. Alabama reversed her course and headed for Samar to assist the greatlv yutnumbered American forces, but the Japanese had retreated by the time she reached the scene. She then joined the protective screen for the Essex task group to hit enemy forces in the central Philippines before retiring to Ulithi on 30 October 1944 for replenishment.

Underway again on 3 November 1944, Alabama screened the

fast carriers as they carried out sustained strikes against Japan-

ese airfields, and installations on Luzon to prepare for a landing on Mindoro Island. She spent the next few weeks engaged in operating against the Visayas and Luzon before retiring to Ulithi on 24 November.

The first half of December 1944 found Alabama engaged in various training exercises and maintenance routines. She left Ulithi on 10 December, and reached the launching point for air strikes on Luzon on 14 December as the fast carrier task forces launched aircraft to carry out preliminary strikes on airfields on Luzon that could threaten the landings slated to take place on Mindoro. From 14 to 16 December a veritable umbrella of carrier aircraft covered the Luzon fields, preventing any enemy planes from getting airborne to challenge the Mindoro-bound convoys. Having completed her mission, she left the area to refuel on 17 December, but, as she reached the fueling rendezvous, began encountering heavy weather. By daybreak on the 18th, rough seas and harrowing conditions rendered a fueling at sea impossible, 50 knot winds caused ships to roll heavily. Alabama experienced rolls of 30 degrees, had both her Vought ''Kingfisher''floatplanes so badly damaged that they were of no further value, and received minor damage to her structure. At one point in the typhoon, Alabama recorded wind gusts up to 83 knots. Three destroyers, Hull (DD-350), Monaghan (DD 354) and Spence (DW-512), were lost to the typhoon. By 19 December the storm had run its course, and Alabama arrived back at Ulithi on 24 December. After pausing there briefly, Alabama continued on to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, for overhaul.

The battleship entered drydock on 18 January 1945, and remained there until 25 February. Work continued until 17 March when Alabama got underway for standardization trials and refresher training along the southern California coast. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on 4 April, arrived there on 10 April

and held a week of training exercises. She then continued on to Ulithi and moored there on 28 April 1945.

Alabama departed Ulithi with TF 58 on 9 May 1945, bound for the Ryukyus, to support forces which had landed on Okinawa on 1 April 1945, and to protect the fast carriers as they launched air strikes on installations in the Ryukyus and on Kyushu. On 14 May, several Japanese planes penetrated the combat air patrol to get at the carriers one crashed Vice Admiral Mitscher's flagship. Alabama's guns splashed two, and assisted in splashing two more

Subsequently, Alabama rode out a typhoon, on 4 and 5 June suffering only superficial damage while the nearby heavy cruiser Pittsburgh (CA-70) lost her bow. Alabama subsequently bombarded the Japanese island of Minami Daito Shima, with other fast battleships, on 10 June 1945 and then headed for Leyte Gulf later in June to prepare to strike at the heart of Japan with the 3d Fleet.

On 1 July 1945, Alabama and other 3d Fleet units got underway for the Japanese home islands. Throughout the month of July 1945, Alabama carried out strikes on targets in industrial areas of Tokyo and other points on Honshu, Hokkaido, and Kyushu on the night of 17 and 18 July, Alabama, and other fast battleships in the task group, carried out the first night bombardment of six major industrial plants in the Hitachi-Mito area of Honshu, about eight miles northeast of Tokyo. On board Alabama to observe the operation was retired Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, the famed polar explorer.

On 9 August, Alabama transferred a medical party to the destroyer Ault (DD - 98), for further transfer to the destroyer Borze (DD-704). The latter had been kamikazied on that date and required prompt medical aid on her distant picket station.

The end of the war found Alahama still at sea, operating off the southern coast of Honshu. On 15 August 1945, she received word of the Japanese capitulation. During the initial occupation of the Yokosuka-Tokyo area, Alabama tranferred detachments of marines and bluejackets for temporary duty ashore, her bluejackets were among the first from the fleet to land. She also served in the screen of the carriers as they conducted reconnaissance flights to locate prisoner-of-war camps.

Alabama entered Tokyo Bay on 5 September to receive men who had served with the occupation forces, and then departed Japanese waters on 20 September. At Okinawa, she embarked 700 sailors—principally members of Navy construction battalions (or "Seabees"—for her part in the "Magic Carpet" operations. She reached San Francisco at mid-day on 15 October, and on Navy Day (27 October 1945) hosted 9, 000 visitors. She then shifted to San Pedro, Calif., on 29 October. Alabama remained at San Pedro through 27 February 1946, when she left for the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for inactivation overhaul. Alabama was decommissioned on 9 January 1947, at the Naval Station, Seattle, and was assigned to the Bremerton Group, United States Pacific Reserve Fleet. She remained there until struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 June 1962.

Citizens of the state of Alabama had formed the "USS Alabama Battleship Commission" to raise funds for the preservation of Alabama as a memorial to the men and women who served in World War II. The ship was awarded to that state on 16 June 1964, and was formally turned over on 7 July 1964 in ceremonies at Seattle. Alabama was then towed to her permanent berth at Mobile, Ala., arriving in Mobile Bay on 14 September 1964.


USS Alabama Crewmen list / P2013-0618D0028

Is dedicated to the men who served aboard this Battleship during World War II and was made possible through contributions from the USS Alabama Crewmen’s Association, the former crewmen listed below, their relatives and associates. Presented to the USS Alabama Battleship Commission on the 17th Day of April, 1982.

Buel T. Adams, Harry B. Aerni, James M. Airgood, Joseph. M. Aman, Alfred A. Anderson, Harry L. Anderson, William H. Anderson, Richard H. Bachman, Anthony Badrick, Norman P. Bagwell, Hubert L. Baker, John W. Barber, Frank B. Basham, Reginald Beaven, Lamar G. Beavers, Edgar O. Beck, Clarence M. Beggs, John F. Beiser, Grant H. Belnap, Harry Berry, Marvin E. Bickford, Richard A. Bicknell, A. William Blaha, Charles V. Blevins, Thomas R. Bowers, Nelson D. Bowman, Robert W. Bozeman, Donald C. Brabston, H. Paul Brantley, Harold K. Brehmer, Edward F. Brown, John R. Brown, Walter T. Brown, Frank H. Brumby, Jr., William T. Burford, Cecil R. Burke, Jr., Marshall L. Burns, Harry C. Busse, Gabe J. Byrd, Clarence A Cagle, Chester D. Caldwell, Travis C. Canada, Edward J. Carr, Andrew F. Carter, II, Theodore H. Cate, Alvin B. Chaplain, Richard J. Chartier, John W. Chew, George E. Christian, Anthony J. Ciappetta, Ross H. Clark, Tom Clayton, Wayne W. Coffman, Salvatore Colombo, Joe A. Coombs, Kenneth A. Cooper, Earl Cowley, Jr., Lanie F. Cox, Jr., William L. Craft.

Carroll A. Creech, Ben N. Crittenden, Samuel Cucinotta, John F. De Entremont, Albert P. De Paemelere, Neil K. Dietrich, Edward V. Duckworth, E. Frank Duncan, Thomas H. Duncan, Lowell P. Dunn, Earl R. Edblad, Knight Edwards, William S. Einwechter, Joseph H. Emanuel, Donald R. English, Richard E. Evans, Gordon S. Everett, Ernest Falwell, Stewart Fehl, Ralph M. Fern, George Ferrie, Lawrence W. Fincham, Richard J. Foote, George W. Frakes, Marvin C. Frame, Edward C. France, John W. Frank, Louis C. Frebes, Bruce H. Freeman, Leroy L. Friday, Jr., John A Fynn, Willis E. Gage, Paul C. Garner, Jack C. Garrett, Arthur A. Gattozzi, Carl E. Getsee, Wilbur P. Giarrusso, James N. Gill, Robert L. Gill, Joseph J. Giolitto, John P. Glynn, Frank I. Gonzalez, Jr., Arthur R. Goodwin, Henry Goslin, Charles L. Gossage, Leo J. Goulet, Charles A. Gray, Boyd Green, Harold S. Gregory, James H. Gregory, Albert A. Grimm, Robert M. Guiser, Jack H. Hackworth, James E. Haddix, Edwin S. Haladej, Ernest J. Hall, Ervin J. Hall, J. Peter Hamel.

John G. Hammock, Henry M. Hancock, Arliss Harris, Elmo L. Harris, Willard J. Harris, James C. Harrison, James G. Hawkins, Cecil W. Hearn, Harold E. Helm, Walter R. Hembree, Myron Herzberg, Shirley Hickman, Allan B. Hildebrand, Forrest P. Hill, Jr., Norman R. Hill, Norman Hilton, Henry P. Hirschel, Adolph F. Hoffman, Roland L. Hokanson, Clarence Holden, Joel M. Holmes, Robert W. Hoover, Attice B. Howard, Herbert B. Howell, Jarrell J. Hulsey, Milton M. Humphrey, Carl F. Hutcheson, Paul N. Hyde, Charles C. Hylton, Harvey J. Jackson, Rex E. James, Vernell E. Jenzen, Earl O. Jones, Harmon T. Joyce, Stanley A. Kaczmarek, Rudolph Kaczmarzyk, Maurice J. Keffer, Kenneth J. Kelly, Arthur C. Kent, Albro A. Keske, Paul W. Kinsey, Sr., Leonard E. Kistner, John J. Kutilek, Leonard L. Lademann, John Lamb, Jr., James Landry, R. A. “Lucky” Langdon, N. W. Laudenslayer, William, L. Leeds, John Lesko, Oliff Lewallen, Thomas I. Locke, Aubrey F. Lomax, William C. Lowe, John J. Maffei, George W. Mahler, James N. Mallett, Joe Marin.

Robert S. Mars, Buster V. Martin, Clarence T. Martin, Fred Martin, Sr., James P. Martin, Richard J. Mason, John Matwey, Menotti L. Mazza, Robert S. McCall, Sr., Elford T. McDaniel, Gordon D. McKenzie, Jack W. McQuerry, Harry M. Means, Richard E. Merchant, Charles P. Miller, Roy J. Miller, Carl J. Miller, Carl E. Milner, Carl W. Minnis, Walter R. Mitchell, Lester G. Monk, Carl E. Mulally, Laurel S. Murphy, Melvin L. Murphy, Raymond M. Naset, Jr., Calvin P. Nebel, Gerald D. Nelson, Hildor E. Nelson, Kenneth Nelson, James S. Newton, Raymond D. Nicholas, Alvin Norman, William J. Norton, Sr., Siro A. Nuscis, Harold G. Olson, Walter G. Overbey, H. C. Overstreet, Donald H. Packard, Johnny L. Pancake, Carrol B. Parker, Harry R. Peaper, Roscoe B. Pendry, Floyd N. Peterson, John L. Pike, John E. Pond, Jr., Roy R. Powell, T. Edward Pressley, Elery P. Price, Forrest Price, Jr., Louis B. Remmers, Garland H. Rhodes, Ellis Richardson, Matthew D. R. Riddell, Austin T. Roberson, Theodore O. Rogers, Joseph F. Ronan, James F. Rooker, Sr., Robert D. Roy, Henry Saalwaechter.

Ralph L. Sayler, Herman L. Schafer, Jr., Meyer Schoenberg, Clifford J. Schuller, Melvin L. Schultz, Gordon J. Scoles, Orley Scott, William M. Self, Charles R. Seward, Harvey H. Shaffer, Harold F. Sherrill, Tom Shields, Jr., Wallace J. Sicard, George H. Sickles, William C. Simon, Amos Simpson, Herbert Simpson, Charles N. Sinclair, Wattie M. Singletary, James E. Sisk, Harold F. Smith, Jesse E. Smith, Jr., Lester L. Smith, Malcolm E. Smith, Philip C. Smith, R. L. Smith, Pete Spano, William A. Spengler, Alvin J. Spinner, Francis C. Sporer, Donald A. Sproul, Ally Z. Standefer, Charles Stiller, Allan B. Stratford, Robert W. Strawser, Stanley L. Strother, Alfred R. Suhr, Jack Sweetman, Theodore S. Swift, Leonard C. Teal, William B. Tennant, Lawrence E. Thompson, Frederick L. Tracy, William L. Turbyfill, J. Harold Uren, Alexander Vankevich, Emmett D. Vickers, Ernest E. Ward, Percy A. Wasson, George F. Waters, Lloyd R. Weaver, Howard J. Weinert, Harry West, Roy H. White, Arvie T. Whitenton, William E. Wildason, Paul F. Zelewicz, Sr., William F. Zollars, Sr., Grant Zwick.

Laura “Mike” Brown, Vera E. Bowman, William J. Diffley, Rosmaree Diffley, Naida J. Gossage, Sunny S. Goulet, Charlie W. Gray, Elizabeth J. Gray, Linda J. Gray, Mary Ann Hill, Darrel J. Hokanson, May A. Hokanson, Sharol A. Hokanson, B. A. Jeffcoat, Jr., Pam Jeffcoat.

James P. Keating, Jr., Geraldine C. Matwey, James F. McDonald, Edna Olson, Bette J. Pillotte, John Pinto, Charles H. Riddle, James Rooker, Jr..

Joyce Rooker, Claude J. Rouleau, Ray C. Shaw, William H. Spradlin, Jr., Bruce T. Swift, Carlton E. Swift, Garry T. Swift, Gregory A. Swift.

James R. Swift, James G. Thornton, William T. Thornton, Jr., Lawton Weeks, L. Roger Young, Ronna E. Young, Spencer K. Young.

American Legion Club #60, Bemis, Braid & Langdon, Inc., Edward M. Crough, Inc.


Brief History

The USS Alabama is a battleship and was the sixth ship of the United States Navy which was named after the state of Alabama. It was commissioned in 1942 and served in the Atlantic during the Second World War. She was decommissioned in 1947 and assigned to reserve duty. She was finally retired in 1962 and in 1964 the ship was taken to Mobile Bay and became a museum ship. It was added to the National Historic Landmark registry in 1986.

During the Second World War, USS Alabama escorted aircraft carriers bombarded Nauru Island and treated the wounded sailors. The ship is now a memorial to the men and women who served and lost their lives during the war. It was towed to its permanent location in 1964. It opened as a museum on the 9 th of January 1965. Visitors can view the inside of the main gun turrets, as well as anti-aircraft guns.

The ship has been recently used as a hurricane shelter in recent years and during Hurricane Katrina, it suffered damage. USS Alabama has been used for most of the battleship scenes of the movie Under Siege. It was also used as a stand-in for USS Iowa in the television series War and Remembrance.


Contents

In May 1962, USS Alabama had been ordered scrapped along with her South Dakota-class sister ships, USS South Dakota, USS Indiana, and USS Massachusetts. [4] Citizens of the state of Alabama had formed the "USS Alabama Battleship Commission" to raise funds for the preservation of Alabama as a memorial to the men and women who served in World War II. Alabama's school children raised approximately $100,000 in nickels and dimes from lunch money and allowances to help the cause. [4] The ship was awarded to the state on June 16, 1964, and was formally turned over on July 7, 1964 in ceremonies at Seattle, Washington. Alabama was then towed to her permanent berth at Mobile, Alabama, arriving in Mobile Bay on September 14, 1964 and opening as a museum ship on January 9, 1965. [4] Alabama was joined in 1969 by USS Drum, a World War II Gato-class submarine, which was moored behind her until 2001, when the submarine was moved onto land for preservation in a permanent display. [5] In 2003 a replica of a Confederate submarine that was built in Mobile, CSS H. L. Hunley, was moved to the park. [6]

Hurricane Katrina caused more than $7 million in damages to Battleship Memorial Park on August 29, 2005 when it came ashore. [4] It almost completely destroyed the aircraft pavilion and gave Alabama an eight-degree list to port and shifting at her permanent anchorage. [7] This forced the park to temporarily close for repairs it reopened on January 9, 2006. [8]

The park is owned by the state of Alabama and is run by an independent government agency, the USS Alabama Battleship Commission. The commission consists of eighteen members from over the entire state appointed by the Alabama governor. It has oversight of all operations at the park. [9]

  • The World War II-era battleship USS Alabama (BB-60) .
  • The World War II era submarine USS Drum (SS-228) . and fighter planes ranging from a B-52 from the Vietnam War, a P-51 Mustang flown by the Tuskegee Airmen to an A-12 spyplane.
  • A PBR (River Patrol Boat) used in the Vietnam War.
  • Military equipment ranging from items such as a Skysweeper M51 anti-aircraft gun to a M4 Sherman tank.
  • A Redstone MRBM (medium range ballistic missile). Memorial
  • Vietnam War Memorial

The 2001 USA Cross Country Championships were held at a cross country running course in the park. [10]


USS Alabama BB60

The USS Alabama BB60 was a South Dakota class battleship that entered service with the British Home Fleet in 1943 but that spent most of the war operating in the Pacific, where she provided cover for the fast carriers and performed some shore bombardments.

The Alabama was laid down in February 1940, launched on 16 February 1942 and commissioned on 16 August 1942, an impressive six months later. The Alabama began the war with six quad mountings for 40mm guns and twenty two 20mm guns. By the end of the war this had risen to twelve quad 40mm mountings and fifty six 20mm guns.

The Alabama entered service in June 1943 when she joined the South Dakota at Scapa Flow. This allowed the British battleships Howe and King George V to take part in the invasion of Sicily. While at Scapa the Alabama took part in a sortie off the Norwegian coast, designed to distract German attention away from Sicily. This was one of the less successful deception plans of the period as the Germans never actually noticed the fleet at sea.

The Alabama and South Dakota left the UK on 1 August 1943 and reached the US on 9 August. The Alabama reached the New Hebrides in mid-September and moved forward to Fiji on 7 November. Her first operation in the Pacific came soon afterwards when she supported Operation Galvanic, the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. She was used to protect the carriers as they attacked Jaluit and Mille atolls, and directly supported the landings on Tarawa on 20 November. On 8 December she took part in the first shore bombardment carried out by the fast battleships, attacking Japanese positions on Nauru Island.

Eight of the fast battleships took part in Operation Flintlock, the invasion of the Marshalls (29 January 1944). North Carolina, South Dakota and Alabama provided an escort for TG58.3 (the carriers Essex, Intrepid and Cabot) and were positioned off Maloelap Atoll, which was strongly garrisoned by the Japanese, but bypassed by American land forces. The Alabama bombarded Roi on 29 January and Namur on 30 January, firing an impressive 330 rounds of 16in shells.

On 17-18 February 1944 six of the fast battleships took part in a raid on Truk. Alabama, Massachusetts, North Carolina and South Dakota provided the close escort for the carriers as part of TG 58.3.

In March 1944 the Alabama supported the carriers as they attacked the Caroline Islands. In April she supported attacks on the New Guinea coast and the invasion of Aitape.

On 1 May New Jersey, Iowa, Alabama, Massachusetts, North Carolina, South Dakota and the newly repaired Indiana took part in a bombardment of Ponape in the Caroline Islands. After this the Massachusetts went for a refit.

Seven of the fast battleships were present at the Battle of the Philippine Sea (June 1944). New Jersey, Iowa, Alabama, Washington, North Carolina, South Dakota and Indiana formed TG58.7 (Battle Line), under Admiral Lee. Their role was to serve as a bombardment force during the invasion of the Mariana Islands and to engage any Japanese surface force that threatened the carriers. The battle itself proved to be an entirely aerial affair, and so although the battleships were attacked from the air they were never involved in a surface battle. The Alabama did play one important part in the battle where her radar was the first to detect the incoming Japanese aircraft on 19 June.

In July the Alabama served as the flagship of Rear Admiral E. W. Hanson, commander of Battleship Division 9, during the invasion of Guam. She also took part in the invasions of Palau, Ulithi and Yap in September.

In September-October 1944 the fast battleships New Jersey, Iowa, Alabama, Washington, Massachusetts and Indiana formed part of Task Force 38 during Admiral Halsey's series of raids on targets around the Philippine Sea. Alabama, Washington, Massachusetts and Indiana formed part of TG 38.3 under Admiral Lee.

This powerful US fleet attacked Palau (6-8 September), Mindanao (10 September), the Visayas (12-14 September) and Luzon (21-22 September). Japanese resistance to this raid was so weak that the Americans decided to bring the invasion of the Philippines forward from December to 20 October and to skip the southern islands and begin with an invasion of Leyte.

The fleet then carried out a second set of raids, this time hitting Okinawa (10 October), Luzon (11 October and 15 October) and Formosa (12-14 October). This time the Japanese responded in some force, but the resulting battle off Formosa (12-16 October 1944) was a crushing defeat for them. The Americans shot down over 600 Japanese aircraft, crippling their air power just before the battle of Leyte Gulf.

The fast battleships had a frustrating time during the Battle of Leyte Gulf (23-26 October 1944). At first they were split into three pairs. Iowa and New Jersey formed TG38.2. South Dakota and Massachusetts formed TG38.3. Washington and Alabama formed TG38.4. Each of these groups protected part of Halsey's carrier force, which was spread out to the north of Leyte Gulf. They faced two of the four Japanese fleets approaching for the 'decisive battle' - Kurita's powerful battleships, approaching from the west, and Ozawa's empty carriers, coming from the north. On 24 October Kurita's fleet came under constant air attack, and the super-battleship Musashi was sunk. Halsey was convinced that Kurita no longer posed a threat, and so when Ozawa's carriers were detected late in the day he decided to take his entire fleet north to deal with them. The six fast battleships were formed into Task Force 34, and were sent north to act as the vanguard of a dash towards the Japanese carriers.

Admiral Lee, commanding the battleships, protested against this move, believing correctly that it would allow Admiral Kurita to pass unopposed through the San Bernardino Strait and potentially attack the weaker US 7th Fleet in Leyte Gulf. Halsey overruled Lee's protests and the battleships headed north. During the morning of 25 October the fast battleships moved ever further to the north, away from Kurita's powerful force, which was now engaged in a desperate battle with a group of escort carriers (Battle of the Samar Sea). During the morning Halsey received a series of increasingly desperate calls for help from the south, but it was a message from Nimitz at Hawaii that eventually convinced him to send the battleships south.

At 10.55 Lee was ordered to head south at top speed, at which point he was only 42 nautical miles from the Japanese carriers (all of Ozawa's carriers were sunk by American aircraft in the battle of Cape Engano). By this time the worst of the crisis to the south was over, but Kurita was still in a potentially dangerous position off the east coast of the Philippines. Once again Lee missed the chance for a surface battle. Kurita retreated through the San Bernardino Strait at 10pm on 25 October and Lee arrived off the straits at 1am on 26 October. This was the last occasion on which US and Japanese battleships were close enough for a possible surface battle. For the rest of the war the fast battleships would perform a valuable role, mainly providing anti-aircraft fire to protect the carriers along with some shore bombardment, but they would never again have a chance to perform their main role of surface warfare.

In November-December the Alabama supported the invasion of Mindoro. She then returned to Puget Sound for a refit, and was in dry-dock from 18 January to 25 February 1945. She returned to the fleet in late April, and in May sailed to Okinawa to join the forces supporting the invasion. She was also used to provide cover for the carriers as they attacked the Ryukyus and Kyushu.

On 10 June she bombarded the island of Minami Daito Shima, then in July took part in bombardments of industrial targets around Tokyo and Honshu.

After the Japanese surrender the Alabama provided marines for the first occupation forces. She sailed into Tokyo Bay on 5 September, embarked men from the occupation forces and then left Japan on 20 September. She stopped at Okinawa to pick up 700 sailors and reached San Francisco on 15 October.

The Alabama was decommissioned in January 1947 and struck off the Navy List in 1962. She was preserved as a monument at Mobile, Alabama.


Amazing Drone Footage of the USS Alabama A.K.A “Lucky A”

The USS Alabama is indeed, of outstanding historic significance to the American people, having led a storied career as a World War II battleship, and finding a well-deserved end as a memorial ship in Mobile, Alabama.

Efforts toward the birth of Alabama began with the laying of her keel on February 1, 1940, at the Norfolk Navy Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia.

By then, WWII was well underway, but the United States was not yet officially involved.

The United States would head into the war following the surprise bombing of Pearl Harbor which cost the lives of over 2000 American sailors and turned the USS Arizona into a memorial wreck. Indeed the Second World War had been looming on the horizon for a long while, with the constant deterioration of situations in Europe and Asia. None the less, America never foresaw such a dramatic entry into the war.

The U.S. Navy battleship USS Alabama (BB-60) under construction at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Virginia (USA), circa 1941.

The USS Alabama would be launched on the 16 th of February 1942, and on the 16 th of August, she was commissioned into service with the US Navy.

Launching, at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, 16 February 1942.

The first of her many expeditions began with the Royal Navy. She, along with her sister ship South Dakota, had been deployed to join the Home Fleet of the Royal Navy, to help cover the northern convoy routes. She took part in the reinforcement operation on the island of Spitzbergen which took her across the Arctic Circle. About a month later, Alabama was on Operation Governor which sought to divert German defenses towards southern Norway ahead of the invasion of Sicily.

This operation would have set the stage for combat with the 42,000-ton German battleship Tirpitz. However, Tirpitz refused to be lured out of her northern Norwegian seaport.

USS Alabama (BB-60) 1 December 1942

The USS Alabama had a short life as a fighting ship. Commissioned in 1942, it was already out of service by 1947.

Alabama, just like her sister battleships from the South Dakota class, had a standard displacement of 35,000 tons and a main battery comprising nine 16-inch .45 caliber Mark 6 guns. She sailed the seas at a speed of 27.5 knots, with a range of 15,000 nautical miles.

Besides a complement of 1,793 crewmembers, she could field two OS2U Kingfisher recon aircraft.

After her assignment with the Royal Navy, Alabama would find herself being steamed to the Pacific theatre, where an intense encounter with the Japanese forces was waiting.

Ship’s forward 16/45 guns train to starboard during a North Atlantic battle practice. Photographed during her shakedown period, circa December 1942 – January 1943

Her first operation in the Pacific theatre came on November 11 th , 1943 during the assault on the Gilbert Islands where her big guns protected fast aircraft carriers against Japanese surface and air strikes. She supported Marine landings on Tarawa Atoll and soon afterward, played the same role at Makin Atoll.

She would, on the 8th December blast the shore installations on Nauru Island, in the company of five other battleships, contributing over 535 large caliber rounds to the bombardment of the Island.

By the end of the operation, she served as escort to the aircraft carriers Bunker Hill and Monterey before arriving at Pearl Harbor on 12 January 1944.

Gilberts Operation, November 1943: U.S. Navy ships of Task Force 50 en route to the Gilberts and Marshalls to support the invasions of Makin and Tarawa, 12 November 1943. Ships are (l-r): USS Alabama (BB-60) USS Indiana (BB-58), in the distance, wearing dazzle camouflage and USS Monterey (CVL-26).

After going through drydock repairs at the Pearl Harbor Navy Shipyard, she was ready to return to the combat zone.

Before the end of January, she was in Operation Flintlock, firing over 300 rounds of 16-inch shells and over 1,000 rounds of 5-inch guns, destroying Japanese planes, facilities, blockhouses, and artillery emplacements.

After Flintlock, Alabama continued to protect aircraft carriers in heavy carrier air strikes over the Islands of Tinian, Saipan, and Guam.

Alabama found consistent service in the Pacific theater, taking part in operations in the Carolines, Okinawa, and Taiwan.

The U.S. Navy battleship USS Alabama (BB-60) in Casco Bay, Maine (USA), during her shakedown period, circa December 1942.

On the18th of December, she was caught up in a typhoon which damaged her scout planes and put a minor dent on her structure. However, 3 destroyers in her group did not survive the one-day-long typhoon.

For her services in the war, Alabama earned a total of nine US Navy battle stars.

She was decommissioned on January 9, 1947, and was finally stricken off the Naval Vessel Registry on June 1, 1962.

Alabama in Seattle, Washington in 1947 along with her sister Indiana as part of the United States Pacific Reserve Fleet

All through her days in the war, Alabama was never damaged by enemy action. She shot down 22 enemy aircraft and suffered the death of five personnel while repelling Japanese air strikes.

These casualties happened due to an accident on the battleship, and not from the guns of the enemy. The event occured on the 21 st of February 1944, during attacks on the Marianas, Alabama had accidentally fired her 5-inch .38 caliber mount number 9 into her 5-inch .38 caliber mount number 5, killing 5 men and injuring 11.

View looking aft from the bow during a snowstorm. Taken during her shakedown cruise, circa January 1943

Because she never lost a single man from enemy guns, she was nicknamed the “Lucky A”.

Alabama was awarded to her namesake state, on the 16 th of June 1964 following efforts by Alabama citizens geared towards preserving the battleship.

Alabama citizens had begun an organization called “The USS Alabama Commission” in a bid to raise funds to preserve her as a memorial to all male and female personnel who served in World War II. This effort involved virtually every Alabama citizen, including school children who raised nearly $100,000 in nickels and dimes squeezed out of lunch money and other petty allowances.

Alabama as a museum ship in Mobile Bay, Alabama, 1985

Almost $1 million was ultimately raised for the project.

After the handover ceremony at Seattle on the 7th of July 1964, Alabama was towed 5,600 miles to her berth at Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, Alabama.

On the 9 th of January 1965, Alabama was opened as a museum ship, and would in 1986 be declared a National Historic Landmark.


ALABAMA BB 60

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    South Dakota Class Battleship
    Keel Laid 1 February 1940 - Launched 16 February 1942

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Post Office Established 16 August 1942 - Disestablished 31 July 1946

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. A-65

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. A-65

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. A-65a

Censored sailor's mail. From the Bob Govern collection.

Marking from back of cover

Other Information

USS ALABAMA earned 9 Battle Stars for her WWII service

NAMESAKE - Named for the state of Alabama. The 22d state, admitted to the Union on December 14 1819, whose name is derived from two Choctaw Indian words: "alba amo", meaning "thicket gatherers" or "vegetation gatherers".

Six ships of the US Navy have been named ALABAMA - USS Alabama (Ship-of-the-Line 1819), USS Alabama (Side Wheel Steamer 1851), USS Alabama Battleship No. 8, USS Alabama SP-1052, USS Alabama BB-60 and USS Alabama SSBN-731.

Another ALABAMA named ship - (Alabama—a wooden-hull side-wheel steamer built in 1838 at Baltimore, Md.—apparently operated under the aegis of the War Department during the War with Mexico (1846-1848), carrying troops that participated in the capture of Veracruz. After the close of hostilities, the War Department transferred Alabama to the Navy Department pursuant to the Act of Congress of 3 March 1849. The latter, however, found the ship "unsuitable for naval purposes" and sold her at public auction, at New Orleans, La., in October 1849. Records of her naval service (if any) have not been found. It does not appear that she did in fact serve in the United States Navy, since her name does not appear in any contemporary listings of naval vessels, nor do any deck logs exist. She was ultimately lost, stranding on Gun Key, in the Bahamas, on 12 July 1852. Fortunately, no lives were lost. )

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


World War II Database


ww2dbase USS Alabama was launched at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Virginia, United States in Feb 1942, three months after the US entered WW2. She was commissioned into service in Aug of the same year. She held her shakedown cruise in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States in late 1942 and held training operations off Casco Bay, Maine, United States in early 1943. She departed the United States in Apr 1943 for Britain alongside of her sister ship USS South Dakota, joining the British Royal Navy Home Fleet at Scapa Flow, Scotland, United Kingdom on 19 May. After a period of training, she covered the landing of Allied troops on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, situated on the border between the Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Sea, in Jun 1943. In the following month, she participated in Operation Governor which aimed to draw German attention toward southern Norway while the Allied forces prepared for the actual target of Sicily, Italy. On 1 Aug, she was detached from the Royal Navy and began sailing for the United States, arriving in Norfolk 8 days later.

ww2dbase After a scheduled overhaul at Norfolk, USS Alabama sailed for the South Pacific, arriving in the New Hebrides by Sep 1943, in time to participate the invasions of Gilbert Islands she provided anti-aircraft fire for fleet carriers and provided gunfire support for the landings at Tarawa Atoll and Makin Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. After a very brief time in the drydock at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii for a scheduled overhaul, she returned to the South Pacific in late Jan 1944 and joined the fleet that supported the invasion of Marshall Islands. On 16 and 17 Feb, she escorted US carriers as their carrier aircraft raided the Japanese naval base at Truk, Caroline Islands. From Truk, the fleet sailed toward Mariana Islands, where the carrier aircraft raided Japanese positions on Tinian, Saipan, and Guam. In early Mar 1944, she temporarily served, for the period of five days, as the flagship of Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher of the US Navy Fast Carrier Task Force. In late Mar and early Apr, she supported carrier raids on several Caroline Islands bases. Later in Apr, she supported landings in the northern coast of Australian New Guinea and Dutch New Guinea. On 12 Jun, USS Alabama provided defense for US carriers while the carrier aircraft struck Japanese positions on Saipan in the Mariana Islands on the following day, she bombarded Saipan with her guns for six hours in an attempt to soften the shore defenses prior to the amphibious assault which was to take place on 15 Jun. On 19 Jun 1944, her radar picked up incoming enemy aircraft, but it was initially thought to be inaccurate in the ensuing Battle of the Philippine Sea, later nicknamed "Great Marianas Turkey Shoot" by the Americans, she would play a minor role, firing sporadically on Japanese aircraft that broke through the perimeter defenses. In Jul and then Sep, she escorted carriers during the Guam of Mariana Islands and Palau, Ulithi, and Yap of Caroline Islands actions. Between Sep and Nov 1944, she escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft struck Japanese positions across the Philippine Islands. She saw a brief period of respite from fighting in early Dec at Ulithi, Caroline Islands, conducting training exercises. She departed Ulithi on 10 Dec and resumed her station alongside carriers off Luzon, Philippine Islands by 14 Dec. USS Alabama returned to the United States in Jan 1945, spending time at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington through Mar 1945 for repairs. After a period of training off southern California, United States, she returned to the South Pacific in late Apr 1945 to support the Okinawa, Japan invasion that was already in progress. During the night of 17 to 18 Jul, she bombarded industrial targets in the Hitachi-Mito area 13 kilometers northeast of Tokyo, Japan.

ww2dbase When the Pacific War ended, USS Alabama was underway south of Japan. Her Marines detachment, supported by sailors, assisted in the occupation of the Yokosuka-Tokyo area of Japan. She departed Japanese waters in Sep, bringing home US servicemen from Japanese Home Islands and Okinawa to San Francisco, California, United States, arriving on 15 Oct. She underwent deactivation overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and was decommissioned in Jan 1947. She was a part of the Bremerton Group of the United States Pacific Reserve Fleet until 1962 when she was struck from the US Naval Register. She was turned over to the government of the state of Alabama, United States to be operated as a museum ship, and the battleship began her life in that capacity starting in 1965 at Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, Alabama, United States, where she still remains today.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Apr 2013

Battleship Alabama (BB-60) Interactive Map

Alabama Operational Timeline

1 Apr 1939 The order for the future battleship Alabama was issued.
1 Feb 1940 The keel of battleship Alabama was laid down at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
16 Feb 1942 Battleship Alabama was launched at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States, sponsored by Henrietta McCormick Hill, the wife of US Senator J. Lister Hill.
16 Aug 1942 USS Alabama was commissioned into service with Captain George B. Wilson in command.
11 Nov 1942 USS Alabama began her shakedown cruise in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States.
11 Jan 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States from Casco Bay, Maine, United States.
13 Feb 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Casco Bay, Maine, United States.
2 Apr 1943 USS Alabama departed the United States for Britain.
19 May 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Scapa Flow, Scotland, United Kingdom.
1 Aug 1943 USS Alabama was detached from the British Royal Navy Home Fleet and departed Scapa Flow, Scotland, United Kingdom.
9 Aug 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
19 Aug 1943 USS Alabama completed a scheduled overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
20 Aug 1943 USS Alabama departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
25 Aug 1943 USS Alabama transited the Panama Canal.
14 Sep 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Havannah Harbor, Efate Island, New Hebrides Islands.
7 Nov 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Fiji.
11 Nov 1943 USS Alabama departed Fiji in support of the Gilbert Islands operation.
20 Nov 1943 USS Alabama provided naval gunfire support for the US landing at Betio, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands.
26 Nov 1943 During the night, USS Alabama fired anti-aircraft guns against incoming Japanese raids.
8 Dec 1943 USS Alabama bombarded Nauru, expending 535 406-millimeter rounds. During the bombardment, destroyer USS Boyd received a hit from a Japanese coastal gun the medical staff aboard USS Alabama treated three wounded sailors from USS Boyd.
12 Dec 1943 USS Alabama arrived at Efate Island, New Hebrides Islands.
5 Jan 1944 USS Alabama departed Efate Island, New Hebrides Islands.
12 Jan 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
21 Jan 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Funafuti, Ellice Islands.
25 Jan 1944 USS Alabama departed Funafuti, Ellice Islands.
29 Jan 1944 USS Alabama bombarded Japanese positions on Roi, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands.
30 Jan 1944 USS Alabama bombarded Japanese positions on Namur, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands.
12 Feb 1944 USS Alabama departed to escort US carriers for the raid on Truk, Caroline Islands.
16 Feb 1944 USS Alabama escorted carriers while carrier aircraft attacked Truk, Caroline Islands.
17 Feb 1944 USS Alabama escorted carriers while carrier aircraft attacked Truk, Caroline Islands.
21 Feb 1944 While at sea, USS Alabama's secondary gun mount No. 9 accidentally fired into secondary gun mount No. 5, killing 5 and wounding 11.
22 Feb 1944 USS Alabama patrolled in waters southeast of Saipan, Mariana Islands.
26 Feb 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
3 Mar 1944 USS Alabama became the flagship of Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher of the US Navy Fast Carrier Task Force at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
8 Mar 1944 USS Alabama was relieved as the flagship of Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher of the US Navy Fast Carrier Task Force at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
22 Mar 1944 USS Alabama departed Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
29 Mar 1944 USS Alabama shared the credit in the downing of at least one Japanese aircraft which were attempting to attack US carriers.
30 Mar 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions at Palau, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai in the Caroline Islands.
13 Apr 1944 USS Alabama departed Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
4 May 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.
12 Jun 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions on Saipan, Mariana Islands.
13 Jun 1944 USS Alabama bombarded Japanese positions on Saipan, Mariana Islands.
14 Jul 1944 USS Alabama, flagship of Rear Admiral E. W. Hanson, departed Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
21 Jul 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions on Guam, Mariana Islands.
11 Aug 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
30 Aug 1944 USS Alabama departed Eniwetok, Marshall Islands.
6 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions in the Caroline Islands.
7 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions in the Caroline Islands.
8 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft attacked Japanese positions in the Caroline Islands.
12 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the Philippine Islands.
13 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the Philippine Islands.
14 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the Philippine Islands.
21 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the Manila Bay area in the Philippine Islands.
22 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the Manila Bay area in the Philippine Islands.
24 Sep 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the central area of the Philippine Islands.
28 Sep 1944 USS Alabama arrived in Saipan, Mariana Islands.
1 Oct 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
6 Oct 1944 USS Alabama departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 Oct 1944 USS Alabama shot down three attacking Japanese aircraft while operating south of Taiwan.
25 Oct 1944 USS Alabama supported landing operations on Leyte, Philippine Islands.
30 Oct 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
3 Nov 1944 USS Alabama departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
24 Nov 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
10 Dec 1944 USS Alabama departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 Dec 1944 USS Alabama escorted US carriers off Luzon, Philippine Islands as carrier aircraft began attacking Japanese positions in the area.
17 Dec 1944 USS Alabama departed waters off Luzon, Philippine Islands.
18 Dec 1944 Heavy seas caused by Typhoon Cobra damaged the two OS2U Kingfisher floatplanes aboard USS Alabama.
18 Dec 1944 Many ships from the United States Third Fleet, Task Force 38 sailed into Typhoon Cobra in the Philippine Sea. Three destroyers and 790 men were lost.
24 Dec 1944 USS Alabama arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
18 Jan 1945 USS Alabama entered a drydock at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, United States.
25 Feb 1945 USS Alabama exited a drydock at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, United States.
17 Mar 1945 USS Alabama departed Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, United States.
4 Apr 1945 USS Alabama departed California, United States.
10 Apr 1945 USS Alabama arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
28 Apr 1945 USS Alabama arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
9 May 1945 USS Alabama departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 May 1945 USS Alabama shot down two of the several Japanese aircraft that attempted to attack US warships she also shared credit with anti-aircraft crews of other ships for the downing two other aircraft during the attack.
4 Jun 1945 Many ships from the United States Third Fleet, primarily Task Groups 38.1 and 30.8 sailed into Typhoon Connie south of Japan. No ships were lost but 7 men lost their lives.
5 Jun 1945 USS Alabama suffered minor damage from a typhoon.
1 Jul 1945 USS Alabama set sail for the Japanese Home Islands.
9 Aug 1945 Medical staff aboard USS Alabama visited destroyers USS Ault and USS Borie to provide medical assistance.
5 Sep 1945 USS Alabama entered Tokyo Bay, Japan.
20 Sep 1945 USS Alabama departed Japan.
15 Oct 1945 USS Alabama arrived at San Francisco, California, United States at about 1200 hours.
27 Oct 1945 USS Alabama hosted 9,000 civilian visitors at San Francisco, California, United States.
29 Oct 1945 USS Alabama departed San Francisco, California, United States and arrived at San Pedro, which was also in California.
27 Feb 1946 USS Alabama departed San Pedro, California, United States for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington, United States.
9 Jan 1947 USS Alabama was decommissioned from service at Naval Station Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington, United States.
1 Jun 1962 Battleship Alabama was struck from the US Naval Register while at Seattle, Washington, United States.
11 Jun 1964 Battleship Alabama was named a museum ship while at Seattle, Washington, United States
16 Jun 1964 Battleship Alabama was turned over to the government of the state of Alabama, United States while at Seattle, Washington, United States.
7 Jul 1964 The government of the state of Alabama, United States ceremonially took over ownership of battleship Alabama at Seattle, Washington, United States.
14 Sep 1964 Battleship Alabama arrived, by tow, at Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, Alabama, United States.
9 Jan 1965 Battleship Alabama was open to visitors as a museum ship.
14 Jan 1986 Battleship Alabama was entered into the US National Register of Historic Places.
9 Jan 2006 Battleship Alabama, having been closed due to storm damage, re-opened as a museum ship.

Did you enjoy this article or find this article helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.