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Fifteen Anglo-Saxon Cures for Minor Medical Problems

How did people Anglo-Saxon England treat a headache or indigestion? Here are fifteen cures for minor ailments from the Lacucgna, which include what to do if your finger nail falls off, and how Jesus Christ cured Peter’s toothache.Recently, researchers in the United Kingdom discovered that an Anglo-Saxon remedy for eye infections is effective against the bacteria Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – click here to read about it – which has prompted interest in the possibilities medieval cures has for modern-day medicine.
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Podcasts

10 Moments in the Invention of Guns and Gunpowder

The invention of gunpowder, followed by weapons that could make use of it, is one of the most important developments in military history. The technology emerged in China in the eighth-century, and would spread throughout Asia and Europe during the Middle Ages.Here is our list of ten key moments in the development of guns and gunpowder:804 – Qing Xuzi is the first person to record the recipe that makes gunpowder.
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The Problem of Mayda, an Island Appearing on Medieval Maps

The Problem of Mayda, an Island Appearing on Medieval MapsBy William H. BabcockGeographical Review, Vol. 9, No. 4 (1920)Introduction: Of all the legendary islands and island names on the medieval maps, Mayda has been the most enduring. The shape of the island has generally approximated a crescent; its site most often has been far west of lower Brittany and more or less nearly southwest of Ireland; the spelling of the name sometimes has varied to Maida, Mayd, Mayde, Asmaida, or Asmayda.
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Roots, Replica, Replay: European Medievalisms after 1945

Roots, Replica, Replay: European Medievalisms after 1945By Valentin GroebnerPráticas da História: Journal on Theory, Historiography and Uses of the Past, Vol.4 (2017)Abstract: Since the end of the 18th century, the Middle Ages were, in the learned culture of European elites, much more than simply a historical period.
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Curtiss H-4 3492 from the Front

Curtiss H-4 3492 from the Front Here we see Curtiss H-4 Small America serial 3592 on some hard standing. The circular rim around the engines suggest this aircraft has been given Anzani engines, a change made by the RNAS to try and improve its performance.
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Leprosy and Plague in St Giles in the Fields

By Rebecca RidealIn a curious quirk of history, the epicentre of the Great Plague of 1665 was also the location of London’s primary medieval leprosy hospital. To the likes of Samuel Pepys, Nell Gwynn and Charles II, St Giles in the Fields was London’s largest outer parishes. Close to the capital’s burgeoning playhouses, it was a dirty, disorganised and poverty-stricken suburb of ramshackle tenements (just under 2000 households in total) and narrow streets, containing inns, brothels, butchers, watchmakers, booksellers, beltmakers, justices of the peace and nobility.
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